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peasant
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The Horse and His Boy
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peasant
Used In
The Horse and His Boy
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  • Several other travellers were before them on the bridge, mostly peasants driving laden donkeys and mules or carrying baskets on their heads.
  • But one of them picked a carrot out of a peasant’s basket and threw it at Shasta with a rough laugh, saying: "Hey!"
  • She said, "Both the human will have to dress in rags and look like peasants or slaves And all Aravis’s armour and our saddles and things must be made into bundles and put on our backs, and the children must pretend to drive us and people will think we’re on pack-horses."
  • It was much more crowded than Shasta had expected: crowded partly by the peasants (on their way to market) who had come in with them, but also with watersellers, sweetmeat sellers, porters, soldiers, beggars, ragged children, hens, stray dogs, and bare-footed slaves.
  • Lasaraleen wanted to go back on the whole arrangement and kept on telling Aravis that Narnia was a country of perpetual snow and ice inhabited by demons and sorcerers, and she was mad to think of going there. "And with a peasant boy, too!" said Lasaraleen.

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  • Most people in the Middle Ages were peasants.
  • In 1932 a peasant revolt in Su County China stopped collection of the poppy tax.

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