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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
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  • ...and the children, watching from their hiding-place, could see the face of Aslan looking all small and different without its mane.
  • For when they tried to look at Aslan’s face they just caught a glimpse of the golden mane and the great, royal, solemn, overwhelming eyes; and then they found they couldn’t look at him and went all trembly.
  • He’ll put all to rights as it says in an old rhyme in these parts: Wrong will be right, when Aslan comes in sight, At the sound of his roar, sorrows will be no more, When he bares his teeth, winter meets its death, And when he shakes his mane, we shall have spring again.
  • Lay your hands on my mane so that I can feel you are there and let us walk like that.
  • There, shining in the sunrise, larger than they had seen him before, shaking his mane (for it had apparently grown again) stood Aslan himself.
  • Then imagine instead of the black or grey or chestnut back of the horse the soft roughness of golden fur, and the mane flying back in the wind.
  • And both the girls cried bitterly (though they hardly knew why) and clung to the Lion and kissed his mane and his nose and his paws and his great, sad eyes.
  • And he crouched down and the children climbed on to his warm, golden back, and Susan sat first, holding on tightly to his mane and Lucy sat behind holding on tightly to Susan.
  • "By the Lion’s Mane, a strange device," said King Peter, "to set a lantern here where the trees cluster so thick about it and so high above it that if it were lit it should give light to no man!"
  • Then a tiny streak of gold began to run along his white marble back then it spread — then the colour seemed to lick all over him as the flame licks all over a bit of paper — then, while his hindquarters were still obviously stone, the lion shook his mane and all the heavy, stone folds rippled into living hair.
  • The Lion shook his mane and clapped his paws together ("Terrible paws," thought Lucy, "if he didn’t know how to velvet them!") and said, "Meanwhile, let the feast be prepared.
  • Aslan, who seemed to have been thinking about something else, roused himself with a shake of his magnificent mane and said, "Eh?

  • There are no more uses of "mane" in the book.

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  • It was a healthy male lion with a golden mane.
  • She brushed the horse’s mane and tail.

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