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peasant
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The Brothers Karamazov
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peasant
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The Brothers Karamazov
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  • Can a Russian peasant be said to feel, in comparison with an educated man?
  • But Father Zossima, on entering the portico, went first straight to the peasants who were crowded at the foot of the three steps that led up into the portico.
  • Yet we are peasants though we live in the town.
  • Peasant Women Who Have Faith Near the wooden portico below, built on to the outer wall of the precinct, there was a crowd of about twenty peasant women.
  • Peasant Women Who Have Faith Near the wooden portico below, built on to the outer wall of the precinct, there was a crowd of about twenty peasant women.
  • But Ivan and Kalganov went through the ceremony in the most simple-hearted and complete manner, kissing his hand as peasants do.
  • I got gypsies there and champagne and made all the peasants there drunk on it, and all the women and girls.
  • The peasants are not very fond of listening to these soup-makers, so far.
  • Our peasants are swindlers, and don’t deserve to be pitied, and it’s a good thing they’re still flogged sometimes.
  • We’ve left off thrashing the peasants, we’ve grown so clever, but they go on thrashing themselves.
  • An exhausted, consumptive-looking, though young peasant woman was gazing at him in silence.
  • He got up and looked cheerfully at a healthy peasant woman with a tiny baby in her arms.
  • He was evidently a monk of the humblest, that is of the peasant, class, of a narrow outlook, but a true believer, and, in his own way, a stubborn one.
  • The Russian peasant, the laborer, brings here the farthing earned by his horny hand, wringing it from his family and the tax-gatherer!
  • Am I to become a peasant or a shepherd?
  • There is a forest in winter, and on a roadway through the forest, in absolute solitude, stands a peasant in a torn kaftan and bark shoes.
  • And as for the ideas he may be hatching, the Russian peasant, generally speaking, needs thrashing.
  • He was dressed in a peasant’s long reddish coat of coarse convict cloth (as it used to be called) and had a stout rope round his waist.
  • He found himself in a regular peasant’s room.
  • She wanted to make it touching, a regular peasant’s feeling.
  • There are lines in Nekrassov describing how a peasant lashes a horse on the eyes, ’on its meek eyes,’ every one must have seen it.
  • In the end this unhappy young woman, kept in terror from her childhood, fell into that kind of nervous disease which is most frequently found in peasant women who are said to be "possessed by devils."
  • The peasant beats it, beats it savagely, beats it at last not knowing what he is doing in the intoxication of cruelty, thrashes it mercilessly over and over again.
  • He understood it, but that the elder Zossima was this saint and custodian of God’s truth—of that he had no more doubt than the weeping peasants and the sick women who held out their children to the elder.
  • A Lady Of Little Faith A visitor looking on the scene of his conversation with the peasants and his blessing them shed silent tears and wiped them away with her handkerchief.
  • It was simply a peasant’s hut, though it looked like a chapel, for it contained an extraordinary number of ikons with lamps perpetually burning before them—which men brought to the monastery as offerings to God.
  • Do you suppose that the peasants don’t understand?
  • The peasants are rotting in drunkenness and cannot shake off the habit.
  • More than half the peasants were in his clutches, every one in the neighborhood was in debt to him.
  • From the neighboring landowners he bought and rented lands which were worked by the peasants, in payment of debts which they could never shake off.
  • Are the peasants here worth such kindness, Dmitri Fyodorovitch, or the girls either?
  • You gave the peasants champagne to drink the other day, e—ech!
  • If the peasants had asked him for money at that moment, he would have pulled out his notes and given them away right and left.
  • Though you keep kissing the peasants and shouting, I see something.
  • And those other two …. peasants….
  • At their door stood one of the peasants with a metal plate on his breast.
  • You can put peasants off their guard like that, but not me.
  • Several peasants accompanied the lawyers and remained on the same side of the curtain.
  • Mitya was left alone with the peasants, who stood in silence, never taking their eyes off him.
  • They questioned all the peasants suggested by Trifon Borissovitch, Stepan and Semyon, the driver Andrey, and Kalganov.
  • The peasants and the driver unhesitatingly confirmed Trifon Borissovitch’s evidence.
  • At the gates there was a crowd of people, peasants, women and drivers.
  • You see what our peasants are, Mavriky Mavrikyevitch.
  • This Gorstkin looks like a peasant, he wears a blue kaftan, but he is a regular rogue.
  • The fourth, Father Anfim, was a very old and humble little monk of the poorest peasant class.
  • A good-looking peasant lad, about eighteen, joined us; he had to hurry back next morning to pull a merchant’s barge along the bank.
  • Take care of the peasant and guard his heart.
  • That’s your duty as monks, for the peasant has God in his heart.
  • He visits princes, though he is only a peasant corrupted.
  • Once upon a time there was a peasant woman and a very wicked woman she was.
  • He is a peasant, he does business in timber.
  • "Oh, the irony of fate!" cried Mitya, and, quite losing his head, he fell again to rousing the tipsy peasant.
  • And the drunken peasant still lay snoring.
  • Mitya fussed about the drunken peasant for half an hour, wetting his head, and gravely resolved not to sleep all night.
  • The curly-headed peasant was sitting on the bench and had his coat on.
  • Mitya jumped up and saw at once that the cursed peasant was drunk again, hopelessly and incurably.
  • The peasant was silently and slyly watching him, with insulting composure, and even a sort of contemptuous condescension, so Mitya fancied.
  • "That’s a lie!" said the peasant, calmly and confidently.
  • "I don’t know any of your Fyodor Pavlovitches," said the peasant, speaking thickly.
  • The peasant stroked his beard importantly.
  • The peasant still stroked his beard, and suddenly screwed up his eyes cunningly.
  • The peasant sat watching him and grinning.
  • Mitya was silent, and though Andrey was, as a rule, a talkative peasant, he did not utter a word, either.
  • Speak, simple peasant heart!
  • Trifon Borissovitch was a thick-set, healthy peasant, of middle height, with a rather fat face.
  • What’s the good of giving a peasant a cigar to smoke, the stinking ruffian!
  • He was very indignant, too, at the peasant girls drinking liqueur, and eating sweets.
  • "It’s swinish, all this peasant foolery," he murmured, moving away; "it’s the game they play when it’s light all night in summer."
  • But what was his indignation when Nikolay Parfenovitch came back with quite different clothes, brought in behind him by a peasant.
  • And the peasant drove him smartly, he had a fair, long beard.
  • He was not an old man, somewhere about fifty, and he had on a gray peasant’s smock.
  • And Mitya was struck by his saying, in his peasant way, "the babe," and he liked the peasant’s calling it a "babe."
  • And Mitya was struck by his saying, in his peasant way, "the babe," and he liked the peasant’s calling it a "babe."
  • The peasant who had been ordered to drive the second cart was pulling on his smock, stoutly maintaining that it was not his turn to go, but Akim’s.
  • The peasant persisted and besought them to wait.
  • But later on I learnt with astonishment from medical specialists that there is no pretense about it, that it is a terrible illness to which women are subject, specially prevalent among us in Russia, and that it is due to the hard lot of the peasant women.
  • Oh! he understood that for the humble soul of the Russian peasant, worn out by grief and toil, and still more by the everlasting injustice and everlasting sin, his own and the world’s, it was the greatest need and comfort to find some one or something holy to fall down before and worship.
  • People used to tell, laughing at Mitya, how he had given champagne to grimy-handed peasants, and feasted the village women and girls on sweets and Strasburg pies.
  • He was driving somewhere in the steppes, where he had been stationed long ago, and a peasant was driving him in a cart with a pair of horses, through snow and sleet.
  • But God will save Russia, for though the peasants are corrupted and cannot renounce their filthy sin, yet they know it is cursed by God and that they do wrong in sinning.
  • (f) Of Masters and Servants, and of whether it is possible for them to be Brothers in the Spirit Of course, I don’t deny that there is sin in the peasants too.
  • A peasant legend!
  • He intervened in the nick of time, civilly and obsequiously persuading Mitya not to give away "cigars and Rhine wine," and, above all, money to the peasants as he had done before.
  • He had a special gift for mystifying murderers and other criminals of the peasant class during interrogation, and if he did not win their respect, he certainly succeeded in arousing their wonder.
  • Dressed in another man’s clothes he felt himself disgraced, even in the eyes of the peasants, and of Trifon Borissovitch, whose face appeared, for some reason, in the doorway, and vanished immediately.
  • His expression was severe and uncompromising, especially with the peasants of Mokroe, but he had the power of assuming the most obsequious countenance, when he had an inkling that it was to his interest.
  • Nikolay Parfenovitch, moreover, in the presence of the peasant witnesses, passed his fingers along the collar, the cuffs, and all the seams of the coat and trousers, obviously looking for something—money, of course.
  • Let him read them about Abraham and Sarah, about Isaac and Rebecca, of how Jacob went to Laban and wrestled with the Lord in his dream and said, "This place is holy"—and he will impress the devout mind of the peasant.
  • He was a lean, middle-aged peasant, with a very long face, flaxen curls, and a long, thin, reddish beard, wearing a blue cotton shirt and a black waistcoat, from the pocket of which peeped the chain of a silver watch.
  • All sorts of people began coming into the room to look on, peasants and their women, who had been roused from sleep and attracted by the hopes of another marvelous entertainment such as they had enjoyed a month before.
  • Only a little tiny seed is needed—drop it into the heart of the peasant and it won’t die, it will live in his soul all his life, it will be hidden in the midst of his darkness and sin, like a bright spot, like a great reminder.
  • He tried to talk to the driver, and he felt intensely interested in an answer the peasant made him; but a minute later he realized that he was not catching anything, and that he had not really even taken in the peasant’s answer.
  • He tried to talk to the driver, and he felt intensely interested in an answer the peasant made him; but a minute later he realized that he was not catching anything, and that he had not really even taken in the peasant’s answer.
  • He never found out who this kind man was; perhaps one of the peasant witnesses, or Nikolay Parfenovitch’s little secretary, had compassionately thought to put a pillow under his head; but his whole soul was quivering with tears.
  • I like talking to the peasants, and am always glad to do them justice.
  • One has to know how to talk to the peasants.
  • "There are all sorts of peasants," Kolya observed to Smurov after a brief silence.
  • I like talking to the peasants….
  • We’ve dropped behind the peasants—that’s an axiom.
  • And, as luck would have it, all the peasants saw us at that moment and they kicked up a shindy at once.
  • I remember the twelve jurymen—four were petty officials of the town, two were merchants, and six peasants and artisans of the town.
  • There is no need to speak of the artisans and the peasants.
  • The artisans of Skotoprigonyevsk are almost peasants, and even work on the land.
  • Our peasants are robbers, you know; they have no care for their souls.
  • "Whatever he says, he won’t get round our peasants."
  • The Peasants Stand Firm This was how Fetyukovitch concluded his speech, and the enthusiasm of the audience burst like an irresistible storm.
  • But they are not all peasants.
  • Well, our peasants have stood firm.
  • What a funny-looking peasant!
  • "That peasant’s beard’s frozen," Kolya cried in a loud provocative voice as he passed him.
  • "Lots of people’s beards are frozen," the peasant replied, calmly and sententiously.
  • The peasant heaved a sigh from the bottom of his heart.
  • "That was a nice peasant," Kolya observed to Smurov.
  • According to a peasant’s notions, schoolboys are whipped, and must be whipped.
  • There’s another blockhead, that peasant there.
  • Hey, good morning, peasant!
  • A sturdy-looking peasant, with a round, simple face and grizzled beard, who was walking by, raised his head and looked at the boy.
  • I say, you seem a clever peasant.
  • "Cleverer than you," the peasant answered unexpectedly, with the same gravity.
  • I’ll marry you, and you shall become a peasant, a real peasant; we’ll keep a colt, shall we?
  • I’ll marry you, and you shall become a peasant, a real peasant; we’ll keep a colt, shall we?
  • Not far from Marya Kondratyevna’s cottage, Ivan suddenly came upon a solitary drunken little peasant.
  • At that moment they met, and the peasant with a violent lurch fell full tilt against Ivan, who pushed him back furiously.
  • The peasant went flying backwards and fell like a log on the frozen ground.
  • Stopping short, he made out at his feet the peasant he had knocked down, still lying senseless and motionless.
  • I am like the peasant girl, your excellency …. you know.
  • He treated the sick poor and peasants for nothing, visited them in their slums and huts, and left money for medicine, but he was as obstinate as a mule.
  • Firmly and unhesitatingly he bore witness that the sum spent a month before could not have been less than three thousand, that all the peasants about here would testify that they had heard the sum of three thousand mentioned by Dmitri Fyodorovitch himself.
  • On hearing this fact, the priest dropped the subject, though he would have done well to put into words his doubt whether, if Samsonov had sent him to that peasant, calling him Lyagavy, there was not something wrong about it and he was turning him into ridicule.
  • Good-by, peasant!
  • And as for our lousy peasants, it wasn’t a case of flinging half a rouble in the street, he made them presents of twenty-five roubles each, at least, he didn’t give them less.
  • "What will our peasants say now?" said one stout, cross-looking, pock-marked gentleman, a landowner of the neighborhood, approaching a group of gentlemen engaged in conversation.
  • I have seen it myself, I have known it myself, and, would you believe it, the poorer our Russian peasant is, the more noticeable is that serene goodness, for the rich among them are for the most part corrupted already, and much of that is due to our carelessness and indifference.
  • And as they drove in, there were peasant women drawn up along the road, a lot of women, a whole row, all thin and wan, with their faces a sort of brownish color, especially one at the edge, a tall, bony woman, who looked forty, but might have been only twenty, with a long thin face.
  • But, as he had denied the incident of the hundred roubles till the peasants had been called to prove it, his evidence as to returning the money to Mitya was naturally regarded with great suspicion.
  • I won’t describe in detail how Ivan succeeded in his object, bringing the peasant to the police-station and arranging for a doctor to see him at once, providing with a liberal hand for the expenses.
  • Kolya pointed to a tall peasant, with a good-natured countenance in a long sheepskin coat, who was standing by his wagon, clapping together his hands, in their shapeless leather gloves, to warm them.
  • Seeing a light in the little house to the right he went up, knocked at the shutters, and asked the man to whom the house belonged to help him carry the peasant to the police-station, promising him three roubles.
  • Let him open that book and begin reading it without grand words or superciliousness, without condescension to them, but gently and kindly, being glad that he is reading to them and that they are listening with attention, loving the words himself, only stopping from time to time to explain words that are not understood by the peasants.
  • He was obliged, after the peasants had been examined, to admit the finding of the hundred roubles, only adding that he had religiously returned it all to Dmitri Fyodorovitch "in perfect honesty, and it’s only because his honor was in liquor at the time, he wouldn’t remember it."
  • He inquired, however, with surprise, why he called the peasant-trader Gorstkin, Lyagavy, and obligingly explained to Mitya that, though the man’s name really was Lyagavy, he was never called so, as he would be grievously offended at the name, and that he must be sure to call him Gorstkin, "or you’ll do nothing with him; he won’t even listen to you," said the priest in conclusion.
  • Again, taking into consideration that no one in our day, not only you, but actually no one, from the highest person to the lowest peasant, can shove mountains into the sea—except perhaps some one man in the world, or, at most, two, and they most likely are saving their souls in secret somewhere in the Egyptian desert, so you wouldn’t find them—if so it be, if all the rest have no faith, will God curse all the rest? that is, the population of the whole earth, except about two hermits in…
  • I remember, long before the trial, questions were continually asked with some surprise, especially by ladies: "Can such a delicate, complex and psychological case be submitted for decision to petty officials and even peasants?" and "What can an official, still more a peasant, understand in such an affair?"
  • I remember, long before the trial, questions were continually asked with some surprise, especially by ladies: "Can such a delicate, complex and psychological case be submitted for decision to petty officials and even peasants?" and "What can an official, still more a peasant, understand in such an affair?"
  • When Fetyukovitch had to cross-examine him, he scarcely tried to refute his evidence, but began asking him about an incident at the first carousal at Mokroe, a month before the arrest, when Timofey and another peasant called Akim had picked up on the floor in the passage a hundred roubles dropped by Mitya when he was drunk, and had given them to Trifon Borissovitch and received a rouble each from him for doing so.
  • Three dozen of champagne for peasants, upon my word, that’s enough to make any one angry!"
  • I’m simply surprised at your good-nature, with our low peasants, Mavriky Mavrikyevitch, that’s all I can say."
  • Can’t you see it all over his face that he is a fool, that peasant, eh?"
  • ) "He even cried out to the peasant who drove him, ’Do you know, you are driving a murderer!’
  • "If I had not taken my decision so firmly for to-morrow," he reflected with satisfaction, "I should not have stayed a whole hour to look after the peasant, but should have passed by, without caring about his being frozen.

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  • Most people in the Middle Ages were peasants.
  • In 1932 a peasant revolt in Su County China stopped collection of the poppy tax.

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