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socialism
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The Brothers Karamazov
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socialism
Used In
The Brothers Karamazov
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  • In the same way, if he had decided that God and immortality did not exist, he would at once have become an atheist and a socialist.
  • But there are a few peculiar men among them who believe in God and are Christians, but at the same time are socialists.
  • It’s a beautiful Utopian dream of the abolition of war, diplomacy, banks, and so on—something after the fashion of socialism, indeed.
  • The subject was the socialist revolutionaries who were at that time persecuted.
  • ’We are not particularly afraid,’ said he, ’of all these socialists, anarchists, infidels, and revolutionists; we keep watch on them and know all their goings on.
  • You apply them to us, and look upon us as socialists?
  • European Liberals in general, and even our liberal dilettanti, often mix up the final results of socialism with those of Christianity.
  • The socialist who is a Christian is more to be dreaded than a socialist who is an atheist.’
  • The socialist who is a Christian is more to be dreaded than a socialist who is an atheist.’
  • But it’s not only Liberals and dilettanti who mix up socialism and Christianity, but, in many cases, it appears, the police—the foreign police, of course—do the same.
  • And those who do not believe in God talk of socialism or anarchism, of the transformation of all humanity on a new pattern, so that it all comes to the same, they’re the same questions turned inside out.
  • For socialism is not merely the labor question, it is before all things the atheistic question, the question of the form taken by atheism to-day, the question of the tower of Babel built without God, not to mount to heaven from earth but to set up heaven on earth.
  • According to your brother’s account, the tinge of socialism won’t hinder me from laying by the proceeds and investing them under the guidance of some Jew, till at the end of my career I build a great house in Petersburg and move my publishing offices to it, and let out the upper stories to lodgers.
  • He is going to put in a tinge of Socialism, he says.
  • I am a Socialist, Smurov.
  • "And what is a Socialist?" asked Smurov.
  • "I am a Socialist, Karamazov, I am an incurable Socialist," he announced suddenly, apropos of nothing.
  • "I am a Socialist, Karamazov, I am an incurable Socialist," he announced suddenly, apropos of nothing.
  • "A Socialist?" laughed Alyosha.
  • I don’t go in for the career of an archimandrite in the immediate future and don’t become a monk, I shall be sure to go to Petersburg and get on to some solid magazine as a reviewer, that I shall write for the next ten years, and in the end become the owner of the magazine, and bring it out on the liberal and atheistic side, with a socialistic tinge, with a tiny gloss of socialism, but keeping a sharp look out all the time, that is, keeping in with both sides and hoodwinking the fools.
  • I don’t go in for the career of an archimandrite in the immediate future and don’t become a monk, I shall be sure to go to Petersburg and get on to some solid magazine as a reviewer, that I shall write for the next ten years, and in the end become the owner of the magazine, and bring it out on the liberal and atheistic side, with a socialistic tinge, with a tiny gloss of socialism, but keeping a sharp look out all the time, that is, keeping in with both sides and hoodwinking the fools.

  • There are no more uses of "socialism" in the book.


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  • She believes that more socialism would be more fair.
  • John McCain thinks that giving these Americans a break is socialism. Well, I call it opportunity, and there is nothing more American than that.
    Barack Obama  --  http://edition.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/19/campaign.wrap/?iref=mpstoryview(retrieved 07/02/10)

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