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The Brothers Karamazov
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Used In
The Brothers Karamazov
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  • "Ah, you’ve caught up yesterday’s phrase, which so offended Miuesov—and which Dmitri pounced upon so naively, and paraphrased!" he smiled queerly.
  • As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naive and simple-hearted than we suppose.
  • But he was fond of people: he seemed throughout his life to put implicit trust in people: yet no one ever looked on him as a simpleton or naive person.
  • "She’s perhaps too naive," thought Katerina Ivanovna, with a gleam of hope.
  • "No, no, I’m coming to look on, too," exclaimed Kalganov, brushing aside in the most naive way Grushenka’s offer to sit with him.
  • These Sunday markets were naively called "fairs" in the town, and there were many such fairs in the year.
  • That may be, they may stand aside, respectfully or no, but in my poor opinion the great writer ended his book in this way either in an access of childish and naive optimism, or simply in fear of the censorship of the day.

  • There are no more uses of "naive" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • You—Aunty, do you know the stuff in that thing makes Dr. Goebbels look like a naive little country boy?
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • I realize that some naive sliver of me hoped that he was better than this.
    Sabaa Tahir  --  An Ember in the Ashes

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