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The Brothers Karamazov
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The Brothers Karamazov
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  • But he was one of those senseless persons who are very well capable of looking after their worldly affairs, and, apparently, after nothing else.
  • It soon became apparent that he was looking for his mother’s tomb.
  • As for mutual love it did not exist apparently, either in the bride or in him, in spite of Adelaida Ivanovna’s beauty.
  • The letter had been written in haste, the excitement of the writer was apparent in every line of it.
  • Miuesov, too, was trying to take a part, and apparently very eagerly, in the conversation.
  • As far as Church jurisdiction is concerned he is apparently quite opposed to the separation of Church from State.
  • An incident occurred on the road, which, though apparently of little consequence, made a great impression on him.
  • The whole group was talking eagerly about something, apparently holding a council.
  • "I have a great favor to ask of you, Alexey Fyodorovitch," she began, addressing Alyosha with an apparently calm and even voice, as though nothing had happened.
  • The latter, at last, answered him, not condescendingly, as Alyosha had feared, but with modesty and reserve, with evident goodwill and apparently without the slightest arriere-pensee.
  • He was very handsome, too, graceful, moderately tall, with hair of a dark brown, with a regular, rather long, oval-shaped face, and wide-set dark gray, shining eyes; he was very thoughtful, and apparently very serene.
  • It was only then apparent how unquestionably every one in our town had accepted Father Zossima during his lifetime as a great saint.
  • "Fyodor Pavlovitch himself has so begged you to," he said at last, slowly and apparently attaching no significance to his answer.
  • His father was standing near the window, apparently lost in thought.
  • The old man was sitting down at the table, apparently disappointed.
  • Often he was listless and lazy, at other times he would grow excited, sometimes, apparently, over the most trivial matters.
  • "No, I didn’t go home," answered Mitya, apparently perfectly composed, but looking at the floor.
  • I note this fact, later on it will be apparent why I do so.
  • The effects of the glass she had just drunk were apparent.
  • The one on the sofa was lolling backwards, smoking a pipe, and Mitya had an impression of a stoutish, broad-faced, short little man, who was apparently angry about something.
  • They had long before formulated this damning conclusion, and the worst of it was that a sort of triumphant satisfaction at that conclusion became more and more apparent every moment.
  • Fyodor Pavlovitch seems to have been the first to suggest, apparently in joke, that they should all meet in Father Zossima’s cell, and that, without appealing to his direct intervention, they might more decently come to an understanding under the conciliating influence of the elder’s presence.
  • On the contrary, his friends, as I observed already, seeing him that night apparently so cheerful and talkative, were convinced that there was at least a temporary change for the better in his condition.
  • It had begun to get dusk when Rakitin, crossing the pine copse from the hermitage to the monastery, suddenly noticed Alyosha, lying face downwards on the ground under a tree, not moving and apparently asleep.
  • Here he chose a spot, apparently the very place, where according to the tradition, he knew Lizaveta had once climbed over it: "If she could climb over it," the thought, God knows why, occurred to him, "surely I can."
  • What seemed to him strangest of all was that his brother Ivan, on whom alone he had rested his hopes, and who alone had such influence on his father that he could have stopped him, sat now quite unmoved, with downcast eyes, apparently waiting with interest to see how it would end, as though he had nothing to do with it.
  • I do not know the details, but I have only heard that the orphan girl, a meek and gentle creature, was once cut down from a halter in which she was hanging from a nail in the loft, so terrible were her sufferings from the caprice and everlasting nagging of this old woman, who was apparently not bad-hearted but had become an insufferable tyrant through idleness.
  • But by now Ivan had apparently regained his self-control.
  • He met Ivan with a slow silent gaze, and was apparently not at all surprised at his coming.
  • "Of my words later," Ivan broke in again, apparently with complete self-possession, firmly uttering his words, and not shouting as before.
  • He looked at them and a new idea seemed to dawn upon him, so that he apparently forgot his grief for a minute.
  • Kolya was particularly struck by Alyosha’s apparent diffidence about his opinion of Voltaire.
  • His face became suddenly quite pale, so that it was dreadfully apparent, even through the gathering darkness.
  • "Who is the murderer then, according to you?" he asked, with apparent coldness.
  • But external decorum was still preserved and Father Paissy, with a stern face, continued firmly and distinctly reading aloud the Gospel, apparently not noticing what was taking place around him, though he had, in fact, observed something unusual long before.
  • Apparently he was forbidden by his parents to associate with Krassotkin, who was well known to be a desperately naughty boy, so Smurov was obviously slipping out on the sly.
  • It seemed strange on the face of it that a young man so learned, so proud, and apparently so cautious, should suddenly visit such an infamous house and a father who had ignored him all his life, hardly knew him, never thought of him, and would not under any circumstances have given him money, though he was always afraid that his sons Ivan and Alexey would also come to ask him for it.
  • For it was pointed out, too, that if the decomposition had been natural, as in the case of every dead sinner, it would have been apparent later, after a lapse of at least twenty-four hours, but this premature corruption "was in excess of nature," and so the finger of God was evident.
  • One commits the murder and takes all the trouble while his accomplice lies on one side shamming a fit, apparently to arouse suspicion in every one, alarm in his master and alarm in Grigory.
  • Pyotr Ilyitch seemed to hurry Misha off on purpose, because the boy remained standing with his mouth and eyes wide open, apparently understanding little of Mitya’s orders, gazing up with amazement and terror at his blood-stained face and the trembling bloodstained fingers that held the notes.
  • Ilusha faltered in violent excitement, but apparently unable to go on, he flung his wasted arms round his father and Kolya, uniting them in one embrace, and hugging them as tightly as he could.
  • Then giving his grounds for this opinion, which I omit here, he added that the abnormality was not only evident in many of the prisoner’s actions in the past, but was apparent even now at this very moment.
  • At first he was worried at the arrest of the servant, but his illness and death soon set his mind at rest, for the man’s death was apparently (so he reflected at the time) not owing to his arrest or his fright, but a chill he had taken on the day he ran away, when he had lain all night dead drunk on the damp ground.
  • The criminal can only be made to speak by the sudden and apparently incidental communication of some new fact, of some circumstance of great importance in the case, of which he had no previous idea and could not have foreseen.
  • There are indications, too, if I am not mistaken, that you confessed this yourself to some one, I mean that the money was Katerina Ivanovna’s, and so, it’s extremely surprising to me that hitherto, that is, up to the present moment, you have made such an extraordinary secret of the fifteen hundred you say you put by, apparently connecting a feeling of positive horror with that secret….
  • Father Paissy desired later on to read the Gospel all day and night over his dead friend, but for the present he, as well as the Father Superintendent of the Hermitage, was very busy and occupied, for something extraordinary, an unheard-of, even "unseemly" excitement and impatient expectation began to be apparent in the monks, and the visitors from the monastery hostels, and the crowds of people flocking from the town.
  • You don’t live on tea alone, I suppose," cried Ivan, apparently delighted at having got hold of Alyosha.
  • Your eyes are yellow," Smerdyakov commented, without the least irony, with apparent sympathy in fact.
  • When he was asked to explain how it was apparent now at this moment, the old doctor, with simple-hearted directness, pointed out that the prisoner on entering the court had "an extraordinary air, remarkable in the circumstances"; that he had "marched in like a soldier, looking straight before him, though it would have been more natural for him to look to the left where, among the public, the ladies were sitting, seeing that he was a great admirer of the fair sex and must be thinking…

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  • The effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the dry fields.
  • The committee investigated some apparent discrepancies.

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