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aberration
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The Brothers Karamazov
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aberration
Used In
The Brothers Karamazov
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  • Listen, what is an aberration?
  • "What aberration?" asked Alyosha, wondering.
  • An aberration in which everything is pardonable.
  • I was talking of aberration.
  • Well, you see, a man may be sitting perfectly sane and suddenly have an aberration.
  • He may be conscious and know what he is doing and yet be in a state of aberration.
  • And there’s no doubt that Dmitri Fyodorovitch was suffering from aberration.
  • They found out about aberration as soon as the law courts were reformed.
  • He must have been in a state of aberration.
  • Suffering from aberration.
  • When he recovered from the blow Dmitri Fyodorovitch gave him on the head, he was suffering from aberration; he went and committed the murder.
  • And, besides, who isn’t suffering from aberration nowadays?
  • Why, my Lise is in a state of aberration.
  • She made me cry again yesterday, and the day before, too, and to-day I suddenly realized that it’s all due to aberration.
  • Then, next day another fit, and the same thing on the third, and yesterday too, and then yesterday that aberration.
  • But apart from temporary aberration, the doctor diagnosed mania, which premised, in his words, to lead to complete insanity in the future.
  • But this nervous condition would not involve the mental aberration of which mention had just been made.
  • —you, I, all of us are in a state of aberration, and there are ever so many examples of it: a man sits singing a song, suddenly something annoys him, he takes a pistol and shoots the first person he comes across, and no one blames him for it.
  • He talked at length and with erudition of "aberration" and "mania," and argued that, from all the facts collected, the prisoner had undoubtedly been in a condition of aberration for several days before his arrest, and, if the crime had been committed by him, it must, even if he were conscious of it, have been almost involuntary, as he had not the power to control the morbid impulse that possessed him.
  • He talked at length and with erudition of "aberration" and "mania," and argued that, from all the facts collected, the prisoner had undoubtedly been in a condition of aberration for several days before his arrest, and, if the crime had been committed by him, it must, even if he were conscious of it, have been almost involuntary, as he had not the power to control the morbid impulse that possessed him.

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  • The outburst was an aberration, out of keeping with her character.
  • At that moment she cannot have been in her right mind; yet, what was the cause of her temporary aberration I cannot say.
    Dostoyevsky, Fyodor  --  The Gambler

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