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Cupid
in
The Aeneid
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Cupid
Used In
The Aeneid
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  • Cupid meantime assum’d his form and face, Foll’wing Achates with a shorter pace, And brought the gifts.
  • But Venus, anxious for her son’s affairs, New counsels tries, and new designs prepares: That Cupid should assume the shape and face Of sweet Ascanius, and the sprightly grace; Should bring the presents, in her nephew’s stead, And in Eliza’s veins the gentle poison shed: For much she fear’d the Tyrians, double-tongued, And knew the town to Juno’s care belong’d.

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  • Cupid is the Roman counterpart to the Greek Eros.
  • I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow,
    William Shakespeare  --  A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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