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immortal
in
The Aeneid
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immortal
Used In
The Aeneid
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  • To them no bounds of empire I assign, Nor term of years to their immortal line.
  • He said, and brought me, from their blest abodes, The venerable statues of the gods, With ancient Vesta from the sacred choir, The wreaths and relics of th’ immortal fire.
  • If glory cannot move a mind so mean, Nor future praise from fading pleasure wean, Yet why should he defraud his son of fame, And grudge the Romans their immortal name!
  • See, they divide; immortal day appears, And glitt’ring planets dancing in their spheres!
  • BOOK VII And thou, O matron of immortal fame, Here dying, to the shore hast left thy name; Cajeta still the place is call’d from thee, The nurse of great Aeneas’ infancy.
  • Ev’n time, that changes all, yet changes us in vain: The body, not the mind; nor can control Th’ immortal vigor, or abate the soul.
  • The mighty Mother chang’d our forms to these, And gave us life immortal in the seas.
  • Parting, she spoke; and with immortal force Push’d on the vessel in her wat’ry course; For well she knew the way.
  • Judge if such warriors want immortal aid.
  • O hard conditions of immortal state, Tho’ born to death, not privileg’d to die, But forc’d to bear impos’d eternity!
  • The joys are vanish’d: nothing now remains, Of life immortal, but immortal pains.
  • The joys are vanish’d: nothing now remains, Of life immortal, but immortal pains.
  • And here, heroic youth, ’t is here I must To thy immortal memory be just, And sing an act so noble and so new, Posterity will scarce believe ’t is true.
  • Auspicious chief! thy race, in times to come, Shall spread the conquests of imperial RomeRome, whose ascending tow’rs shall heav’n invade, Involving earth and ocean in her shade; High as the Mother of the Gods in place, And proud, like her, of an immortal race.
  • Know this, the realm of night— the Stygian shore: My boat conveys no living bodies o’er; Nor was I pleas’d great Theseus once to bear, Who forc’d a passage with his pointed spear, Nor strong Alcides— men of mighty fame, And from th’ immortal gods their lineage came.
  • In his Aetnaean forge, the God of Fire That fauchion labor’d for the hero’s sire; Immortal keenness on the blade bestow’d, And plung’d it hissing in the Stygian flood.
  • O happy friends! for, if my verse can give Immortal life, your fame shall ever live, Fix’d as the Capitol’s foundation lies, And spread, where’er the Roman eagle flies!
  • I might have promis’d to myself those harms, Mad as I was, when I, with mortal arms, Presum’d against immortal pow’rs to move, And violate with wounds the Queen of Love.
  • The lay records the labors, and the praise, And all th’ immortal acts of Hercules: First, how the mighty babe, when swath’d in bands, The serpents strangled with his infant hands; Then, as in years and matchless force he grew, Th’ Oechalian walls, and Trojan, overthrew.
  • A rav’nous vulture, in his open’d side, Her crooked beak and cruel talons tried; Still for the growing liver digg’d his breast; The growing liver still supplied the feast; Still are his entrails fruitful to their pains: Th’ immortal hunger lasts, th’ immortal food remains.
  • A rav’nous vulture, in his open’d side, Her crooked beak and cruel talons tried; Still for the growing liver digg’d his breast; The growing liver still supplied the feast; Still are his entrails fruitful to their pains: Th’ immortal hunger lasts, th’ immortal food remains.
  • Two snowy coursers Turnus’ chariot yoke, And in his hand two massy spears he shook: Then issued from the camp, in arms divine, Aeneas, author of the Roman line; And by his side Ascanius took his place, The second hope of Rome’s immortal race.
  • Since," said the god, "the Trojans must not join In wish’d alliance with the Latian line; Since endless jarrings and immortal hate Tend but to discompose our happy state; The war henceforward be resign’d to fate: Each to his proper fortune stand or fall; Equal and unconcern’d I look on all.
  • With anxious pleasure when Juturna view’d Th’ increasing fright of the mad multitude, When their short sighs and thick’ning sobs she heard, And found their ready minds for change prepar’d; Dissembling her immortal form, she took Camertus’ mien, his habit, and his look; A chief of ancient blood; in arms well known Was his great sire, and he his greater son.
  • To whom the Father of th’ immortal race, Smiling with that serene indulgent face, With which he drives the clouds and clears the skies, First gave a holy kiss; then thus replies: "Daughter, dismiss thy fears; to thy desire The fates of thine are fix’d, and stand entire.
  • Latium be Latium still; let Alba reign And Rome’s immortal majesty remain."
  • Turnus, ’t is true, in this unequal strife, Shall lose, with honor, his devoted life, Or change it rather for immortal fame, Succeeding to the gods, from whence he came: But you, a servile and inglorious band, For foreign lords shall sow your native land, Those fruitful fields your fighting fathers gain’d, Which have so long their lazy sons sustain’d."

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  • Zeus and the other gods were supposed to be immortal.
  • She believes we have an immortal soul.

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