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prophecy
in
The Aeneid
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prophecy
Used In
The Aeneid
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  • Cassandra cried, and curs’d th’ unhappy hour; Foretold our fate; but, by the god’s decree, All heard, and none believ’d the prophecy.
  • But old Anchises, off’ring sacrifice, And lifting up to heav’n his hands and eyes, Ador’d the greater gods: ’Avert,’ said he, ’These omens; render vain this prophecy, And from th’ impending curse a pious people free!’
  • Latinus, frighted with this dire ostent, For counsel to his father Faunus went, And sought the shades renown’d for prophecy Which near Albunea’s sulph’rous fountain lie.
  • This new portent the seer with wonder views, Then pausing, thus his prophecy renews: "The nymph, who scatters flaming fires around, Shall shine with honor, shall herself be crown’d; But, caus’d by her irrevocable fate, War shall the country waste, and change the state."
  • Besides, old prophecies augment her fears; And stern Aeneas in her dreams appears, Disdainful as by day: she seems, alone, To wander in her sleep, thro’ ways unknown, Guideless and dark; or, in a desart plain, To seek her subjects, and to seek in vain: Like Pentheus, when, distracted with his fear, He saw two suns, and double Thebes, appear; Or mad Orestes, when his mother’s ghost Full in his face infernal torches toss’d, And shook her snaky locks: he shuns the sight, Flies o’er the…
  • Then to the royal seer I thus began: ’O thou, who know’st, beyond the reach of man, The laws of heav’n, and what the stars decree; Whom Phoebus taught unerring prophecy, From his own tripod, and his holy tree; Skill’d in the wing’d inhabitants of air, What auspices their notes and flights declare: O say— for all religious rites portend A happy voyage, and a prosp’rous end; And ev’ry power and omen of the sky Direct my course for destin’d Italy; But only dire Celaeno, from the gods, A…

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  • The prophecy came true.
  • It was a self-fulfilling prophecy.

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