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mane
in
The Aeneid
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mane
Used In
The Aeneid
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  • He said, and, from among the spoils, he draws (Pond’rous with shaggy mane and golden paws) A lion’s hide: to Salius this he gives.
  • ’T is true, a soldier can small honor gain, And boast no conquest, from a woman slain: Yet shall the fact not pass without applause, Of vengeance taken in so just a cause; The punish’d crime shall set my soul at ease, And murm’ring manes of my friends appease.’
  • All have their manes, and those manes bear: The few, so cleans’d, to these abodes repair, And breathe, in ample fields, the soft Elysian air.
  • But, in remembrance of so brave a deed, A tomb and fun’ral honors I decreed; Thrice call’d your manes on the Trojan plains: The place your armor and your name retains.
  • All have their manes, and those manes bear: The few, so cleans’d, to these abodes repair, And breathe, in ample fields, the soft Elysian air.
  • Peace with the manes of great Pallas dwell!
  • Officious grooms stand ready by his side; And some with combs their flowing manes divide, And others stroke their chests and gently soothe their pride.
  • Or seeks his wat’ring in the well-known flood, To quench his thirst, and cool his fiery blood: He swims luxuriant in the liquid plain, And o’er his shoulder flows his waving mane: He neighs, he snorts, he bears his head on high; Before his ample chest the frothy waters fly.
  • As, compass’d with a wood of spears around, The lordly lion still maintains his ground; Grins horrible, retires, and turns again; Threats his distended paws, and shakes his mane; He loses while in vain he presses on, Nor will his courage let him dare to run: So Turnus fares, and, unresolved of flight, Moves tardy back, and just recedes from fight.
  • As, when the swains the Libyan lion chase, He makes a sour retreat, nor mends his pace; But, if the pointed jav’lin pierce his side, The lordly beast returns with double pride: He wrenches out the steel, he roars for pain; His sides he lashes, and erects his mane: So Turnus fares; his eyeballs flash with fire, Thro’ his wide nostrils clouds of smoke expire.
  • Then, as a hungry lion, who beholds A gamesome goat, who frisks about the folds, Or beamy stag, that grazes on the plainHe runs, he roars, he shakes his rising mane, He grins, and opens wide his greedy jaws; The prey lies panting underneath his paws: He fills his famish’d maw; his mouth runs o’er With unchew’d morsels, while he churns the gore: So proud Mezentius rushes on his foes, And first unhappy Acron overthrows: Stretch’d at his length, he spurns the swarthy ground; The lance,
  • Aeneas then advanc’d amidst the train, By thousands follow’d thro’ the flow’ry plain, To great Anchises’ tomb; which when he found, He pour’d to Bacchus, on the hallow’d ground, Two bowls of sparkling wine, of milk two more, And two (from offer’d bulls) of purple gore, With roses then the sepulcher he strow’d And thus his father’s ghost bespoke aloud: "Hail, O ye holy manes! hail again, Paternal ashes, now review’d in vain!

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  • It was a healthy male lion with a golden mane.
  • She brushed the horse’s mane and tail.

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