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The Aeneid
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The Aeneid
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  • And now (the sacred altars plac’d around) The priestess enters, with her hair unbound, And thrice invokes the pow’rs below the ground.
  • Then bowls of tepid milk and blood we pour, And thrice invoke the soul of Polydore.
  • The shouting crew their ships with garlands bind, Invoke the sea gods, and invite the wind.
  • Thy summon’d sister, and thy friend, had come; One sword had serv’d us both, one common tomb: Was I to raise the pile, the pow’rs invoke, Not to be present at the fatal stroke?
  • This part perform’d, the goddess flies sublime To visit Paphos and her native clime; Where garlands, ever green and ever fair, With vows are offer’d, and with solemn pray’r: A hundred altars in her temple smoke; A thousand bleeding hearts her pow’r invoke.
  • The fatal mistress hoists her silken sails, And, shrinking from the fight, invokes the gales.
  • With like design The rest invoke the gods, with sprinkled wine.
  • A milk-white heifer she with flow’rs adorns, And pours the ruddy wine betwixt her horns; And, while the priests with pray’r the gods invoke, She feeds their altars with Sabaean smoke, With hourly care the sacrifice renews, And anxiously the panting entrails views.
  • For these deserts, and this high virtue shown, Ye warlike youths, your heads with garlands crown: Fill high the goblets with a sparkling flood, And with deep draughts invoke our common god.
  • I heard my dearest friend, with dying breath, My name invoking to revenge his death.
  • Forced by this hostile act, and fir’d with spite, That flying Turnus still declin’d the fight, The Prince, whose piety had long repell’d His inborn ardor, now invades the field; Invokes the pow’rs of violated peace, Their rites and injur’d altars to redress; Then, to his rage abandoning the rein, With blood and slaughter’d bodies fills the plain.
  • Then, silence thro’ the hall proclaim’d, she spoke: "O hospitable Jove! we thus invoke, With solemn rites, thy sacred name and pow’r; Bless to both nations this auspicious hour!
  • Struck with unusual fright, the Trojan chief, With lifted hands and eyes, invokes relief; And, "Thrice and four times happy those," he cried, "That under Ilian walls before their parents died!
  • Swiftly she turn’d, and, foaming as she spoke: "Why this delay?" she cried— "the pow’rs invoke!
  • The Daunian hero lifts his hands eyes, And thus invokes the goddess as she flies: "Iris, the grace of heav’n, what pow’r divine Has sent thee down, thro’ dusky clouds to shine?
  • At length he rais’d his cheerful head, and spoke: "The pow’rs," said he, "the pow’rs we both invoke, To you, and yours, and mine, propitious be, And firm our purpose with their augury!
  • (Those only gods Mezentius will invoke.
  • …Night had shed her silver dews around, And with her sable wings embrac’d the ground, When love’s fair goddess, anxious for her son, (New tumults rising, and new wars begun,) Couch’d with her husband in his golden bed, With these alluring words invokes his aid; And, that her pleasing speech his mind may move, Inspires each accent with the charms of love: "While cruel fate conspir’d with Grecian pow’rs, To level with the ground the Trojan tow’rs, I ask’d not aid th’ unhappy to restore,…
  • The priestess pours the wine betwixt their horns; Then cuts the curling hair; that first oblation burns, Invoking Hecate hither to repair: A pow’rful name in hell and upper air.

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  • She invoked the Fifth Amendment as reason not to answer.
  • Both read the same Bible, and pray to the same God; and each invokes his aid against the other.
    Abraham Lincoln (Second Inaugural Address)

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