To better see all uses of the word
The Fountainhead
please enable javascript.

Used In
The Fountainhead
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • His face did not belong to modern civilization, but to ancient Rome; the face of an eternal patrician.
  • So Joel Sutton talked about badminton; that was his hobby; it was a patrician hobby, he explained, he was not being common like other men who wasted time on golf.
  • # The secretary in the reception room looked, startled, at the patrician gentleman whose face she had seen so often in the papers.
  • The patrician head, held level, the fleshless face that had shrunk tighter together.
  • On foggy evenings, under a gas lantern on a street corner, nobody noticed the slender figure leaning against a lamppost, the aristocrat of the Middle Ages, the timeless patrician whose every instinct cried that he should command, whose swift brain told him why he had the right to do so, the feudal baron created to rule—but born to sweep floors and take orders.

  • There are no more uses of "patrician" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • Implicit in the play is a great divide between superiors and inferiors, patricians and plebeians.
    T.E. Kalem  --  Time, 1973  --,9171,907198,00.html#ixzz0YqB0cDQU(retrieved 12/05/09)
  • Anticipating in Lapidus pere someone like Schlepperman—the comic Jew of Jack Benny’s radio program, with his Seventh Avenue accent and hopeless solecisms—I had discovered instead a soft-spoken patrician at ease with his wealth, whose voice was pleasantly edged with the broad vowels and lambent languor of Harvard, from which I discovered he had graduated in chemistry summa cum laude, carrying along with him the expertise to produce the victorious Worm.
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading