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ostentatious
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The Fountainhead
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ostentatious
Used In
The Fountainhead
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  • I want a real wedding, Gail. I want it at the most ostentatious hotel in town.
  • Her trim silk dress was fitted too tightly, revealing the solid rigidity of her corset; a small pin glittered at her throat, small enough to display ostentatiously that it was made of real diamonds.
  • He saw his son’s eyes looking at him blankly from behind the small glasses; the eyes were not ostentatiously sweet, not reproachful, not malicious; just blank.
  • She wants her house to be better than Mrs. Purdee’s—Holcombe did Purdee’s—so if you tell her that Mrs. Purdee’s house looks ostentatious and that true simplicity costs much more money, you’ll get along fine.
  • All the rest is capitalistic ostentation.
  • What they want is ostentation: to show, to stun, to entertain, to impress others.
  • Just as in the passing age of international bankers every building had to have an ostentatious cornice, so now the coming age ordains that every building have a flat roof.
  • He’s just an egomaniac devoid of all moral sense"— —said the society woman dressing for a charity bazaar, who dared not contemplate what means of self-expression would be left to her and how she could impose her ostentation on her friends, if charity were not the all-excusing virtue— —said the social worker who had found no aim in life and could generate no aim from within the sterility of his soul, but basked in virtue and held an unearned respect from all, by grace of his fingers onů

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  • Although wealthy, the family is not ostentatious.
  • She arrived in an ostentatious stretch limo.

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