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confront
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Atlas Shrugged
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confront
Used In
Atlas Shrugged
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  • She looked as if she were studying intently some revelation that had never confronted her before.
  • But they had all known that there was no way; ingenuity was a virtue of the mind-and in the issue confronting them, the mind had been discarded as irrelevant long ago.
  • There was a strange look on the man’s face: bewilderment, as if he had no conception of the issue confronting him, and fear, as if he had always had full knowledge of it and had lived in dread of exposure.
  • He felt relieved: the two men had not come up to confront him in person; they had understood and they would play the game as he was playing it.
  • Lillian studied his face with mild astonishment, but without anxiety or anger, like a person confronted by a puzzle of no significance.
  • The cause is that here, in Galt’s Gulch, there’s no person who would not consider it monstrous ever to confront a child with the slightest suggestion of the irrational.
  • In the dilapidated office of Winston Station, he confronted a sleepy man with slack, worn features, and a frightened young boy who sat at the operator’s desk.
  • He looked at Taggart with the lifelessly conscientious glance of a scholar confronted by a field of knowledge he had never wanted to study.
  • He looked as if so much brutality had confronted him that he had given up the attempt to understand, to trust or to expect anything.
  • And confronting her daily there was the final product of it all, the heir and collector-Cuffy Meigs, the man impervious to thought.
  • This was the act he had then called treason, and this was the man he had rejected in order to go on serving the men confronting him now.
  • Either-or, she thought; this was the choice confronting the world: a human soul in the image of one or of the other.
  • The sight he was confronting was within him.
  • The white face ungroomed by panic, that confronted her when she threw the door open, was James Taggart.
  • It was the face of the man on the window sill, and the faces he had confronted when he had escaped from that room.
  • It was not by means of words that this knowledge confronted his consciousness: as all his knowledge had consisted of emotions, so now he was held by an emotion and a vision that he had no power to dispel.
  • Be it a highwayman who confronts a traveler with the ultimatum: ’Your money or your life,’ or a politician who confronts a country with the ultimatum: ’Your children’s education or your life,’ the meaning of that ultimatum is: ’Your mind or your life’-and neither is possible to man without the other.
  • Be it a highwayman who confronts a traveler with the ultimatum: ’Your money or your life,’ or a politician who confronts a country with the ultimatum: ’Your children’s education or your life,’ the meaning of that ultimatum is: ’Your mind or your life’-and neither is possible to man without the other.
  • She had been flung here by the blind panic of escape, as if it were she who had to hide, she who had to run from the ugliness of being seen in the act of seeing them-a panic made of revulsion, of pity, of embarrassment, of that mental chastity which recoils from confronting a man with the unanswerable proof of his evil.
  • She had confronted James Taggart in his office and said, "Jim, this is your battle.
  • She stopped; this time, she did not gasp; the sight confronting her could not be greeted by anything except a moment of total inner stillness: on the wall, behind a row of machinery, she saw a’ picture cut out of a newspaper-a picture of her, in slacks and shirt, standing by the side of the engine at the opening of the John Galt Line, her head lifted, her smile holding the context, the meaning and the sunlight of that day.
  • She rose to her feet, but stopped: she heard his voice, its tone abruptly changed and grave, as if in answer to the shock of some sight confronting him: "What’s the matter?
  • …instrument-and suddenly Rearden felt as if he were seeing the convulsed figure of a man bent over that telephone, a man who had then known what he, Rearden, was now beginning to learn, a man fighting to refuse him the same request which he was now refusing to the present tenants of this room-he saw the finish of that fight, a man’s tortured face lifted to confront him and a desperate voice saying steadily: "Mr. Rearden, I swear to you …. by the woman I love …. that I am your friend.

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  • You must confront your problems.
  • You must confront your opponent.

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