To better see all uses of the word
Main Street
please enable javascript.

Used In
Main Street
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • She was indignant that Carol should not be utterly fulfilled in having borne Kennicott’s child.
  • Trailing at the end of the line Carol was indignant at the prodding curiosity of the others, their manner of staring at the poor as at a Zoo.
  • In the aisle beside her is an extremely indignant parrakeet in a cage.
  • Mr. Dawson was indignant.
  • She became self-conscious; occasionally she was indignant that she should always have to petition him for the money with which to buy his food.
  • There are in every large chicken-yard a number of old and indignant hens who resemble Mrs. Bogart, and when they are served at Sunday noon dinner, as fricasseed chicken with thick dumplings, they keep up the resemblance.
  • But they were definite enough, and indignant enough.
  • VIII Vida was indignant; Carol was apologetic; they talked for another hour, the eternal Mary and Martha—an immoralist Mary and a reformist Martha.
  • She turned to him with an indignant, "It’s disgusting that this is all you have to look at."
  • She had to roost in a hall-room in a moldy mansion conducted by an indignant decayed gentlewoman, and leave Hugh to the care of a doubtful nurse.
  • Solid though his enthusiasms were in the matter of medicine—his admiration of this city surgeon, his condemnation of that for tricky ways of persuading country practitioners to bring in surgical patients, his indignation about fee-splitting, his pride in a new X-ray apparatus—none of these beatified him as did motoring.
  • Uncle Whittier was nasally indignant "CERTAINLY!

  • There are no more uses of "indignant" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • She was indignant, but agreed to be searched when they accused her of shoplifting.
  • "I am not a fool," she said indignantly.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading