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Main Street
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Main Street
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  • They do not read; apparently they do not think.
  • Her opinionation seemed dead; she had no apparent desire for escape; her brooding centered on Hugh.
  • The great man was apparently waiting.
  • An old woman whose toothless mouth shuts like a mud-turtle’s, and whose hair is not so much white as yellow like moldy linen, with bands of pink skull apparent between the tresses, anxiously lifts her bag, opens it, peers in, closes it, puts it under the seat, and hastily picks it up and opens it and hides it all over again.
  • By his joyousness he had apparently endeared himself to the Dyers.
  • Carol was conscious that Erik was climbing in, that she was apparently to sit in the back, and that she had been left to open the rear door for herself.
  • He would go down apparently the same Main Street (almost certainly it would be called Main Street); in the same drug store he would see the same young man serving the same ice-cream soda to the same young woman with the same magazines and phonograph records under her arm.
  • They were staggered to learn that a real tangible person, living in Minnesota, and married to their own flesh-and-blood relation, could apparently believe that divorce may not always be immoral; that illegitimate children do not bear any special and guaranteed form of curse; that there are ethical authorities outside of the Hebrew Bible; that men have drunk wine yet not died in the gutter; that the capitalistic system of distribution and the Baptist wedding-ceremony were not known in…
  • …Baptist wedding-ceremony were not known in the Garden of Eden; that mushrooms are as edible as corn-beef hash; that the word "dude" is no longer frequently used; that there are Ministers of the Gospel who accept evolution; that some persons of apparent intelligence and business ability do not always vote the Republican ticket straight; that it is not a universal custom to wear scratchy flannels next the skin in winter; that a violin is not inherently more immoral than a chapel organ;…
  • Apparently he despises the farmers because they haven’t reached the social heights of selling thread and buttons."
  • I did like Mrs. Westlake, and I’ve called on her, and apparently she’s gone and twisted everything I’ve said——"

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  • The effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the dry fields.
  • The committee investigated some apparent discrepancies.

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