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anemic
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Babbitt
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anemic
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Babbitt
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  • She had become so dully habituated to married life that in her full matronliness she was as sexless as an anemic nun.
  • There are two anemic towers, one roofed with copper, the other crowned with castiron ferns.
  • When Babbitt was driving down to the office he overtook Eathorne’s car, with the great banker sitting in anemic solemnity behind his chauffeur.
  • One shoulder was lower than the other; one arm she carried in contorted fashion, as though it were paralyzed; and behind a high collar of cheap lace there was a gouge in the anemic neck which had once been shining and softly plump.
  • ) Among the pictures, hung in the exact center of each gray panel, were a red and black imitation English hunting-print, an anemic imitation boudoir-print with a French caption of whose morality Babbitt had always been rather suspicious, and a "hand-colored" photograph of a Colonial room—rag rug, maiden spinning, cat demure before a white fireplace.

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  • The company has been managing anemic growth.
  • What’re you lookin’ so anemic about, Bernard?
    Arthur Miller  --  Death of a Salesman

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