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advocate
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Babbitt
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advocate
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Babbitt
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as in: to advocate Define
to recommend or publicly support someone or something
  • do you mean to say you advocate these strikes?
  • That morning he had advocated lighter lunches and now he ordered nothing but English mutton chop, radishes, peas, deep-dish apple pie, a bit of cheese, and a pot of coffee with cream, adding, as he did invariably, "And uh—Oh, and you might give me an order of French fried potatoes."

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  • He advocated, though he did not practise, the prohibition of alcohol; he praised, though he did not obey, the laws against motor-speeding; he paid his debts; he contributed to the church, the Red Cross, and the Y. M. C. A.; he followed the custom of his clan and cheated only as it was sanctified by precedent; and he never descended to trickery—though, as he explained to Paul Riesling: "Course I don’t mean to say that every ad I write is literally true or that I always believe…
  • You’re supposed to be a sensible, clean, responsible man; you always have been; but here lately, for God knows what reason, I hear from all sorts of sources that you’re running around with a loose crowd, and what’s a whole lot worse, you’ve actually been advocating and supporting some of the most dangerous elements in town, like this fellow Doane."

  • There are no more uses of "advocate" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She advocates stricter gun control.
  • She advocates giving all students the opportunity to attend school in the summer too.

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unspecified meaning
  • As Babbitt sank blissfully into a dim warm tide, the paper-carrier went by whistling, and the rolled-up Advocate thumped the front door.
  • Babbitt flung in mechanically, as he lighted the gloriously satisfying first cigar of the day and tasted the exhilarating drug of the Advocate-Times headlines.

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  • There was more, a great deal more, in the best urban journalistic style of Miss Elnora Pearl Bates, the popular society editor of the Advocate-Times.
  • And what do you advocate?
  • Babbitt looked up irritably from the comic strips in the Evening Advocate.
  • I see by the Advocate that the Presbyterian General Assembly has voted to quit the Interchurch World Movement.
  • Mrs. Babbitt was strangely unmoved by the tidings from the Real Estate and Building column of the Advocate-Times: Ashtabula Street, 496—J. K. Dawson to Thomas Mullally, April 17, 15.
  • Neither the Advocate-Times, the Evening Advocate, nor the Bulletin of the Zenith Chamber of Commerce had ever had an editorial on the matter, and until one of them had spoken he found it hard to form an original opinion.
  • Neither the Advocate-Times, the Evening Advocate, nor the Bulletin of the Zenith Chamber of Commerce had ever had an editorial on the matter, and until one of them had spoken he found it hard to form an original opinion.
  • Then he compromised on watching the Advocate-Times bulletin-board.

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  • There was nothing in the Press, but in the Advocate-Times, on the third page—He gasped.
  • The McKelveys gave him a Singhalese dinner, and Miss Elnora Pearl Bates, society editor of the Advocate-Times, rose to her highest lark-note.
  • Chum Frink suggested as part-time press-agent one Kenneth Escott, reporter on the Advocate-Times.
  • III Young Kenneth Escott, reporter on the Advocate-Times was appointed press-agent of the Chatham Road Presbyterian Sunday School.
  • Once, in the rotogravure section of the Sunday Advocate-Times, there was a photograph of Babbitt and a dozen other business men, with the caption "Leaders of Zenith Finance and Commerce Who Back Prout."
  • For the Saturday edition of the Evening Advocate he wrote editorials on "The Manly Man’s Religion" and "The Dollars and Sense Value of Christianity," which were printed in bold type surrounded by a wiggly border.
  • All of the newspapers save the Advocate-Times and the Evening Advocate attributed this valuable but perhaps hasty direct-action to the American Legion.
  • All of the newspapers save the Advocate-Times and the Evening Advocate attributed this valuable but perhaps hasty direct-action to the American Legion.
  • He had four copies of the paper typed in black with a gorgeous red title, had them bound in pale blue manilla, and affably presented one to old Ira Runyon, the managing editor of the Advocate-Times, who said yes, indeed yes, he was very glad to have it, and he certainly would read it all through—as soon as he could find time.
  • He sang eloquently the advantages of proximity of school-buildings to rentable homes, but he did not know—he did not know that it was worth while to know—whether the city schoolrooms were properly heated, lighted, ventilated, furnished; he did not know how the teachers were chosen; and though he chanted "One of the boasts of Zenith is that we pay our teachers adequately," that was because he had read the statement in the Advocate-Times.
  • They were large, resolute, big-jawed men, and they were all high lords in the land of Zenith—Dr. Dilling the surgeon, Charles McKelvey the contractor, and, most dismaying of all, the white-bearded Colonel Rutherford Snow, owner of the Advocate-Times.
  • Thus it came to pass that in the Sunday Advocate-Times, under a picture of Dr. Drew at his earnestest, with eyes alert, jaw as granite, and rustic lock flamboyant, appeared an inscription—a wood-pulp tablet conferring twenty-four hours’ immortality: The Rev. Dr. John Jennison Drew, M.A., pastor of the beautiful Chatham Road Presbyterian Church in lovely Floral Heights, is a wizard soul-winner.
  • The Advocate-Times reported this speech with unusual fullness: "One of the livest banquets that has recently been pulled off occurred last night in the annual Get-Together Fest of the Zenith Real Estate Board, held in the Venetian Ball Room of the O’Hearn House.
  • But in nothing was he more clearly revealed as the Prominent Citizen than in his lecture on "Brass Tacks Facts on Real Estate," as delivered before the class in Sales Methods at the Zenith Y.M.C.A. The Advocate-Times reported the lecture so fully that Vergil Gunch said to Babbitt, "You’re getting to be one of the classiest spellbinders in town.
  • …Sidney Finkelstein, and even Charles McKelvey told the spectators at movie theaters how great an influence for manly Christianity the "good old Y." had been in their own lives; and the hoar and mighty Colonel Rutherford Snow, owner of the Advocate-Times, was photographed clasping the hand of Sheldon Smeeth of the Y.M.C.A. It is true that afterward, when Smeeth lisped, "You must come to one of our prayer-meetings," the ferocious Colonel bellowed, "What the hell would I do that for?

  • There are no more uses of "advocate" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: to advocate Define
to recommend or publicly support someone or something
as in: an advocate Define
a person who publicly supports and works to advance a cause or more rarely: someone acting in the role of a defense lawyer in England's past and in some jurisdictions today
Show Multiple Meanings
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