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  • Martin perceived that Leora was unusually sloppy—his own word.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In Leora she perceived an interested casualness equal to her own.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • As they walked back, he perceived that she was incredibly the right mate for him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Martin speculated still more as he perceived that all his colleagues were secretly grouped in factions.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He perceived that Mrs. Lanyon's white frock was fluttering about her knees; he realized that she too was strained and still.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And at infrequent times he perceived the comedy of life; relaxed for a gorgeous hour from the intensity wearing to his admirers.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She swelled to perceive how Nobel-prize winners received Her Husband, knew of him, desired to be violent with him about phage, and showed him their work of years.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • At the Institute Martin perceived that he was not the only defender of his country who was not comfortable in the garb of heroes.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • When Sondelius perceived this grudgingness he tried to overcome it by being more noisy and complimentary and enthusiastic than ever.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Rarely had Martin been inspired to perceive the magic of a perfect hour, so absorbed was he ever in irascible pondering, but now he was caught, and lifted in rapture.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • With many jolts he perceived that even outside the bedroom he had to consider the fluctuations and variables of his wife, as A Woman, and sometimes as A Rich Woman.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Martin perceived that Pickerbaugh meant it, and the shame of the realization kept him from leaping up, seizing Leora, and catching the first freight train out of Nautilus.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In the presence of a Napoleon like Clif and a Gladstone like George F. Babbitt, Martin perceived his own lack of power and business skill, and when he had returned to Mohalis he was restless.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He perceived the horror of the shrieking bawdy thing called Success, with its demand that he give up quiet work and parade forth to be pawed by every blind devotee and mud-spattered by every blind enemy.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Incredulously he perceived women asserting that all Germans were baby-killers, universities barring the language of Heine, orchestras outlawing the music of Beethoven, professors in uniform bellowing at clerks, and the clerks never protesting.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Once he raised his head in astonishment to perceive that it was spring; once Terry and he tramped two hundred miles through the Pennsylvania hills, by summer roads; but it seemed only a day later when it was Christmas, and Holabird was being ever so jolly and yuley about the Institute.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He lay and resolved to curse them all in the morning and go off with Leora, but with the coming of the three-o'clock depression he perceived that with him she would probably starve, that he was disgraced, that it was not at all certain he would not become a drunkard.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Next day, when Orchid came into his laboratory and begged, with the wistfulness of youth, "Oh, Dr. Martin, aren't you ever coming to the house again?" he kissed her so briskly, so cheerfully, that even a flapper could perceive that she was unimportant.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He glanced at the balcony— The audience perceived a young man who was being earnest about sera and vaccines but, while his voice buzzed on, that churchly young man had noted two silken ankles distinguishing the front row of the balcony, had discovered that they belonged to Orchid Pickerbaugh and that she was flashing down admiration.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Martin perceived that Wickett's snarls were partly a Clif Clawson misconception of humor, but partly a resentment, as great as Gottlieb's, of the morphological scientists who ticket things with the nicest little tickets, who name things and rename them and never analyze them.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He was fatherly; almost he made Martin repent; but he concluded, "And as for Clawson, his 'joke' regarding this Benoni Carr person—and why I never looked the fellow up is beyond me, I suppose I was too busy—his 'joke,' as you call it, was the action either of an idiot or a blackguard, and until you are able to perceive that fact, I don't think you will be ready to come back to us."  (not reviewed by editor)

  • William T. Smith, assistant in bio-chemistry—the possibility of increasing the effects of all enzymes by doses of X-rays, as he heard one associate-member vituperate another for his notions of cell-chemistry and denounce Ehrlich as "the Edison of medical science," Martin perceived new avenues of exciting research; he stood on a mountain, and unknown valleys, craggy tantalizing paths, were open to his feet.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Capitola McGurk, who hitherto had not perceived him except as an object less interesting than Gladys the Centrifuge, telephoned: ". . . Dr. Tubbs so enthusiastic and Ross and I are so pleased.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: perceive the system as unfair
as in: though blind, can perceive light
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