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All Quiet on the Western Front
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All Quiet on the Western Front
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  • ...there is a double ration of sausage and bread.
  • "I don’t care about the stew, but I can only issue rations for eighty men," persisted Ginger.
  • What’s more important still is the issue of a double ration of smokes.
  • Serve out all the rations.
  • That’s a bad business!—Then we’ll have to pull in our belts and wait till the rations come up in the morning.
  • Disappointed we lie down and consider whether we couldn’t have a go at the iron rations.
  • It was fairly quiet on our sector, so the quartermaster who remained in the rear had requisitioned the usual quantity of rations and provided for the full company of one hundred and fifty men.
  • "That was worth a ration-loaf," says Leer.
  • Only Tjaden seems pleased with the good rations and the rum; he thinks we might even go back to rest without anything happening at all.
  • The cigarettes we put in too, as well as three good rations of liver-sausage that were issued to us this evening.
  • It is a good thing that I get my rations.
  • He sits down to eat as thin as a grasshopper and gets up as big as a bug in the family way; Haie Westhus, of the same age, a peat-digger, who can easily hold a ration-loaf in his hand and say: Guess what I’ve got in my fist; then Detering, a peasant, who thinks of nothing but his farm-yard and his wife; and finally Stanislaus Katczinsky, the leader of our group, shrewd, cunning, and hard-bitten, forty years of age, with a face of the soil, blue eyes, bent shoulders, and a remarkable…

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  • Gasoline was rationed during the 1970s oil embargo.
  • During the Second World War, most commodities were rationed, so more resources could be devoted to the war effort.

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