To better see all uses of the word
however
in
The Age of Innocence
please enable javascript.

however
Used In
The Age of Innocence
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • Mrs. van der Luyden, however, who had seldom surprised any one, now surprised them by reaching her long hand toward the bell-rope.
  • "Nice" women, however wronged, would never claim the kind of freedom he meant, and generous-minded men like himself were therefore—in the heat of argument—the more chivalrously ready to concede it to them.

  • Show more
  • Well—not if the woman, however injured, however irreproachable, has appearances in the least degree against her, has exposed herself by any unconventional action to—to offensive insinuations—
  • Well—not if the woman, however injured, however irreproachable, has appearances in the least degree against her, has exposed herself by any unconventional action to—to offensive insinuations—
  • Presently, however, coming down a foot-path that crossed the highway, he caught sight of a slight figure in a red cloak, with a big dog running ahead.
  • In spite of their best efforts, however, the dinner was a languishing affair.
  • He reflected, however, that Mrs. Struthers’s Sunday evenings were not like a ball, and that her guests, as if to minimise their delinquency, usually went early.
  • He was mindful, however, if not of his own danger, at least of the fact that Mr. Jackson was under his mother’s roof, and consequently his guest.
  • Now, however, as he walked home from Mrs. Mingott’s, he was conscious of a growing distaste for what lay before him.
  • He had, however, taken the precaution to engage in advance a runabout with a pair of old livery-stable trotters that could still do their eighteen miles on level roads; and at two o’clock, hastily deserting the luncheon-table, he sprang into the light carriage and drove off.

  • Show more again
  • It seemed to him so natural—however tragic—that money ill-gotten should be cruelly expiated, that his mind, hardly lingering over Mrs. Beaufort’s doom, wandered back to closer questions.
  • He managed, however, after an exchange of telegrams with the firm, to make his cold last a week; and it shed an ironic light on the situation to know that Mr. Letterblair’s indulgence was partly due to the satisfactory way in which his brilliant young junior partner had settled the troublesome matter of the Olenski divorce.
  • "It’s always one thing after another," the poor lady grieved, in one of her rare revolts against fate; "the only thing that makes me think Mamma must be less well than Dr. Bencomb will admit is this morbid desire to have Ellen come at once, however inconvenient it is to meet her."
  • Before that, however, he had lived much in Paris, frequented the Goncourt grenier, been advised by Maupassant not to attempt to write (even that seemed to Archer a dazzling honour!
  • (They preferred those about peasant life, because of the descriptions of scenery and the pleasanter sentiments, though in general they liked novels about people in society, whose motives and habits were more comprehensible, spoke severely of Dickens, who "had never drawn a gentleman," and considered Thackeray less at home in the great world than Bulwer—who, however, was beginning to be thought old-fashioned.

  • There are no more uses of "however" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: However, complications may... Define
despite that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include in spite of that, nevertheless, nonetheless, and on the other hand.)
as in: However much she tried... Define
to whatever degree (regardless of how much)
as in: However you do it, get it done! Define
in whatever way
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading