To better see all uses of the word
distinct
in
The Age of Innocence
please enable javascript.

distinct
Used In
The Age of Innocence
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Archer was distinctly nervous.
  • In matters intellectual and artistic Newland Archer felt himself distinctly the superior of these chosen specimens of old New York gentility; he had probably read more, thought more, and even seen a good deal more of the world, than any other man of the number.
  • It was a modern building, without distinctive character, but many-windowed, and pleasantly balconied up its wide cream-coloured front.
  • She made no answer, and he sat in silence, watching her profile grow indistinct against the snow-streaked dusk beyond the window.
  • "All over—what do you mean?" he asked in an indistinct stammer.
  • He felt a distinct disappointment on learning that she was away; and almost immediately remembered that, only the day before, he had refused an invitation to spend the following Sunday with the Reggie Chiverses at their house on the Hudson, a few miles below Skuytercliff.
  • Though all these transactions had been widely reported by the Jacksons a sporting minority still clung to the belief that old Catherine would appear in church, and there was a distinct lowering of the temperature when she was found to have been replaced by her daughter-in-law.
  • They enclosed him in a kind of golden haze, through which the faces about him looked remote and indistinct: he had a feeling that if he spoke to his fellow-travellers they would not understand what he was saying.

  • There are no more uses of "distinct" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • Martinez and his colleagues identified 21 distinct emotions made by the human face.
  • Two distinct brain networks guide our judgments.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading