To better see all uses of the word
principle
in
The Age of Innocence
please enable javascript.

principle
Used In
The Age of Innocence
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • For the first time he perceived how elementary his own principles had always been.
  • "It is the principle that I dislike," said Mr. van der Luyden.
  • Like all his family, he esteemed and admired Mrs. van der Luyden; but he found her gentle bending sweetness less approachable than the grimness of some of his mother’s old aunts, fierce spinsters who said "No" on principle before they knew what they were going to be asked.
  • It was a principle in the Welland family that people’s days and hours should be what Mrs. Welland called "provided for."
  • To come to the Opera in a Brown coupe was almost as honourable a way of arriving as in one’s own carriage; and departure by the same means had the immense advantage of enabling one (with a playful allusion to democratic principles) to scramble into the first Brown conveyance in the line, instead of waiting till the cold-and-gin congested nose of one’s own coachman gleamed under the portico of the Academy.
  • So far there had been no exception to its tacit rule that those who broke the law of probity must pay; and every one was aware that even Beaufort and Beaufort’s wife would be offered up unflinchingly to this principle.
  • Another of her principles was that parents should never (at least visibly) interfere with the plans of their married children; and the difficulty of adjusting this respect for May’s independence with the exigency of Mr. Welland’s claims could be overcome only by the exercise of an ingenuity which left not a second of Mrs. Welland’s own time unprovided for.
  • Mrs. Archer and Janey, in the course of their visits to Europe, had so unflinchingly lived up to this principle, and met the friendly advances of their fellow-travellers with an air of such impenetrable reserve, that they had almost achieved the record of never having exchanged a word with a "foreigner" other than those employed in hotels and railway-stations.
  • And she had died thinking the world a good place, full of loving and harmonious households like her own, and resigned to leave it because she was convinced that, whatever happened, Newland would continue to inculcate in Dallas the same principles and prejudices which had shaped his parents’ lives, and that Dallas in turn (when Newland followed her) would transmit the sacred trust to little Bill.

  • There are no more uses of "principle" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • I accept as a basic principle that all people are precious and should be treated with equal dignity.
  • One guiding principle is that everyone should be treated fairly.

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading