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The Age of Innocence
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The Age of Innocence
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  • "Women ought to be free—as free as we are," he declared, making a discovery of which he was too irritated to measure the terrific consequences.
  • "H’m—have you considered the consequences if she decides for divorce?"
  • In consequence of this search he arrived late at the office, perceived that his doing so made no difference whatever to any one, and was filled with sudden exasperation at the elaborate futility of his life.
  • He was mindful, however, if not of his own danger, at least of the fact that Mr. Jackson was under his mother’s roof, and consequently his guest.
  • In consequence, a run on the bank had begun, and its doors were likely to close before the day was over.
  • Mr. Lovell Mingott had been telegraphed for, and messages were being despatched by hand to the members of the family living in New York; and meanwhile there was nothing to do but to discuss in hushed tones the consequences of Beaufort’s dishonour and of his wife’s unjustifiable action.
  • It was Mrs. Welland’s turn to grow pale as the endless consequences of her blunder unrolled themselves before her; but she managed to laugh, and take a second helping of scalloped oysters, before she said, struggling back into her old armour of cheerfulness: "My dear, how could you imagine such a thing?

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  • Think carefully. This is a consequential decision.
  • It is the most consequential tax legislation in decades.

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