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The Age of Innocence
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The Age of Innocence
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  • In my time a cameo set in pearls was thought sufficient.
  • M. Riviere again looked into his hat, as if considering whether these last words were not a sufficiently broad hint to put it on and be gone.
  • What its menace meant he could not guess: but he was sufficiently warned by the fact that Madame Olenska’s name had evoked it.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Welland had been as much surprised as their daughter by the young man’s sudden arrival; but it had occurred to him to explain that he had felt himself on the verge of a nasty cold, and this seemed to Mr. Welland an all-sufficient reason for abandoning any duty.
  • There had been, nevertheless, moments sufficiently difficult to pass; as when Mr. Letterblair, the day after Madame Olenska’s departure, had sent for him to go over the details of the trust which Mrs. Manson Mingott wished to create for her granddaughter.
  • The next day Mrs. Manson Mingott was much better: she recovered her voice sufficiently to give orders that no one should mention the Beauforts to her again, and asked—when Dr. Bencomb appeared—what in the world her family meant by making such a fuss about her health.

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  • We have sufficient supplies.
  • Is there sufficient cause for a search warrant?

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