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The Age of Innocence
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The Age of Innocence
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  • Are you so much afraid, then, of being vulgar?
  • Mr. van der Luyden looked about the room with what would have been self-satisfaction on features less purged of the vulgar passions.
  • Beaufort was vulgar, he was uneducated, he was purse-proud; but the circumstances of his life, and a certain native shrewdness, made him better worth talking to than many men, morally and socially his betters, whose horizon was bounded by the Battery and the Central Park.
  • In my youth," Miss Jackson rejoined, "it was considered vulgar to dress in the newest fashions; and Amy Sillerton has always told me that in Boston the rule was to put away one’s Paris dresses for two years.
  • If society chose to open its doors to vulgar women the harm was not great, though the gain was doubtful; but once it got in the way of tolerating men of obscure origin and tainted wealth the end was total disintegration—and at no distant date.
  • ) "Oh, necessarily; Beaufort is a vulgar man," said Mrs. Archer.
  • But that kind of thing is rather—vulgar, isn’t it?" she suggested, relieved to have hit on a word that would assuredly extinguish the whole subject.
  • Ah, my dear Mr. Archer, I thank my stars I’m nothing but a vulgar Spicer; but there’s not one of my own children that takes after me but my little Ellen."

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  • Her vulgarity was a turnoff.
  • As if I’d ever given her grounds to believe I’d stoop to such vulgarity!
    Anton Chekhov  --  The Cherry Orchard

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