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inconceivable
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The Age of Innocence
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inconceivable
Used In
The Age of Innocence
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  • But such things were inconceivable in New York, and unsettling to think of.
  • A sort of passionate honesty in her made it inconceivable that he should try to draw her into that familiar trap.
  • A stormy discussion as to whether the wedding presents should be "shown" had darkened the last hours before the wedding; and it seemed inconceivable to Archer that grown-up people should work themselves into a state of agitation over such trifles, and that the matter should have been decided (in the negative) by Mrs. Welland’s saying, with indignant tears: "I should as soon turn the reporters loose in my house."
  • It was probable that, little as the van der Luydens encouraged unannounced visits, he could count on being asked to dine, and sent back to the station to catch the nine o’clock train; but more than that he would certainly not get, for it would be inconceivable to his hosts that a gentleman travelling without luggage should wish to spend the night, and distasteful to them to propose it to a person with whom they were on terms of such limited cordiality as Beaufort.

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    Show samples from other sources
  • "Unthinkable! Inconceivable! Absurd! He could never be made into marshmallows!"
    Roald Dahl  --  Charlie And The Chocolate Factory
  • It isn’t inconceivable; it could happen.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Longest Ride

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