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The Age of Innocence
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The Age of Innocence
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  • He passed for an Englishman, was agreeable, handsome, ill-tempered, hospitable and witty.
  • A red blotch on one of her cheeks seemed to show that it had recently been pressed against a pillow, and her half-awakened eyes stared at him hospitably but confusedly.
  • Nevertheless, it might appear inhospitable—and contrary to old Catherine’s express wishes—if Madame Olenska were allowed to arrive without any of the family being at the station to receive her.
  • The Lovell Mingotts had sent out cards for what was known as "a formal dinner" (that is, three extra footmen, two dishes for each course, and a Roman punch in the middle), and had headed their invitations with the words "To meet the Countess Olenska," in accordance with the hospitable American fashion, which treats strangers as if they were royalties, or at least as their ambassadors.
  • She had grown tired of what people called "society"; New York was kind, it was almost oppressively hospitable; she should never forget the way in which it had welcomed her back; but after the first flush of novelty she had found herself, as she phrased it, too "different" to care for the things it cared about—and so she had decided to try Washington, where one was supposed to meet more varieties of people and of opinion.
  • If he did, these domestic activities were privately performed, and he presented to the world the appearance of a careless and hospitable millionaire strolling into his own drawing-room with the detachment of an invited guest, and saying: "My wife’s gloxinias are a marvel, aren’t they?

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  • a good-natured and hospitable man
  • a hospitable environment

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