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agitate
in
The Age of Innocence
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agitate
Used In
The Age of Innocence
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  • Mrs. Archer dropped her needle and pushed her chair back with an agitated hand.
  • Now her sudden recognition of the gift, and her associating it with the tender leave-taking on the stage, filled him with an agitated pleasure.
  • "Ah, there’s a great deal to be said for that plan—indeed I think my uncle Egmont used to say he found it less agitating not to read the morning papers till after dinner," said Mrs. Archer responsively.
  • Such "women" (as they were called) were few in New York, those driving their own carriages still fewer, and the appearance of Miss Fanny Ring in Fifth Avenue at the fashionable hour had profoundly agitated society.
  • She spoke in a low even voice, without tears or visible agitation; and each word, as it dropped from her, fell into his breast like burning lead.
  • There were several ways of answering it, and he gave considerable thought to each one during the watches of an agitated night.
  • If he had probed to the bottom of his vanity (as he sometimes nearly did) he would have found there the wish that his wife should be as worldly-wise and as eager to please as the married lady whose charms had held his fancy through two mildly agitated years; without, of course, any hint of the frailty which had so nearly marred that unhappy being’s life, and had disarranged his own plans for a whole winter.
  • A stormy discussion as to whether the wedding presents should be "shown" had darkened the last hours before the wedding; and it seemed inconceivable to Archer that grown-up people should work themselves into a state of agitation over such trifles, and that the matter should have been decided (in the negative) by Mrs. Welland’s saying, with indignant tears: "I should as soon turn the reporters loose in my house."

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  • Our goal is to agitate public unrest, so there will be a cry for change.
  • She gets agitated whenever the topic comes up.

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