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summon
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The Age of Innocence
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summon
Used In
The Age of Innocence
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  • It was evident that he had been summoned rather for the moral support of the stricken ladies than because of any specific aid that he could render.
  • He was puzzled by the tone in which she had summoned him; he concluded that she was less simple than she seemed.
  • It was odd to have summoned him in that way, and then forgotten him; but Archer felt more curious than mortified.
  • Some two weeks later, Newland Archer, sitting in abstracted idleness in his private compartment of the office of Letterblair, Lamson and Low, attorneys at law, was summoned by the head of the firm.
  • Therefore when a friendly summons came from Mrs. Archer, Mr. Jackson, who was a true eclectic, would usually say to his sister: "I’ve been a little gouty since my last dinner at the Lovell Mingotts’—it will do me good to diet at Adeline’s."
  • She told me she had had a ’spiritual summons,’ whatever that is, from Dr. Carver.
  • A mulatto maid-servant in a bright turban, replying to the summons, informed her mistress that she had seen "Miss Ellen" going down the path to the shore; and Mrs. Mingott turned to Archer.
  • Now, as Archer rang the bell, the long tinkle seemed to echo through a mausoleum; and the surprise of the butler who at length responded to the call was as great as though he had been summoned from his final sleep.
  • Twenty-four hours after Madame Olenska’s summons a telegram announced that she would arrive from Washington on the evening of the following day.
  • A day or two later, on responding to a summons from Mrs. Manson Mingott, his soul had been more deeply tried.
  • It was always an interesting occasion when a young pair launched their first invitations in the third person, and their summons was seldom refused even by the seasoned and sought-after.
  • It was an echo of Ned Winsett’s old appeal to roll his sleeves up and get down into the muck; but spoken by a man who set the example of the gesture, and whose summons to follow him was irresistible.
  • It was only natural that Madame Olenska should have hastened from Washington in response to her grandmother’s summons; but that she should have decided to remain under her roof—especially now that Mrs. Mingott had almost regained her health—was less easy to explain.
  • But his eminence as a valetudinarian now made him an object of engrossing interest, and Mrs. Mingott issued an imperial summons to him to come and compare diets as soon as his temperature permitted; for old Catherine was now the first to recognise that one could not be too careful about temperatures.
  • The mulatto maid put her to bed, brought her a cup of tea as usual, laid everything straight in the room, and went away; but at three in the morning the bell rang again, and the two servants, hastening in at this unwonted summons (for old Catherine usually slept like a baby), had found their mistress sitting up against her pillows with a crooked smile on her face and one little hand hanging limp from its huge arm.
  • "I was sure Newland would manage it," Mrs. Welland had said proudly of her future son-in-law; and old Mrs. Mingott, who had summoned him for a confidential interview, had congratulated him on his cleverness, and added impatiently: "Silly goose!

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  • I was summoned to the principal’s office.
  • I summoned all my courage and walked into the room.

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