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refuge
in
The Age of Innocence
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refuge
Used In
The Age of Innocence
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  • It was evident that the effort of speaking had been much greater than her studied composure betrayed, and that at his first word of reassurance she had dropped back into the usual, as a too-adventurous child takes refuge in its mother’s arms.
  • Miss Jackson glanced around the table, caught Janey’s bulging gaze, and took refuge in an unintelligible murmur.
  • The talk took refuge in less ominous topics; but everything they touched on seemed to confirm Mrs. Archer’s sense of an accelerated trend.
  • "I’m not going till later on: luckily for the convenience of your family," he continued, taking base refuge in sarcasm.
  • He perceived with a flash of chilling insight that in future many problems would be thus negatively solved for him; but as he paid the hansom and followed his wife’s long train into the house he took refuge in the comforting platitude that the first six months were always the most difficult in marriage.
  • All the beauty that had forsaken her face seemed to have taken refuge in the long pale fingers and faintly dimpled knuckles on his sleeve, and he said to himself: "If it were only to see her hand again I should have to follow her—."

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  • The park serves as a refuge for wildlife.
  • She took refuge from the sun under a beautiful oak tree.

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