To see all instances of the word
used in
The Age of Innocence
please enable javascript.

Used in
The Age of Innocence
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • His own fancy inclined to Japan.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Her own inclination (after a month with the Paris dressmakers) was for mountaineering in July and swimming in August.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Archer inclined to the former theory; he fancied that her New York was still completely undifferentiated, and the conjecture nettled him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Archer had always been inclined to think that chance and circumstance played a small part in shaping people's lots compared with their innate tendency to have things happen to them.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Meanwhile the carriage had worked its way out of the coil about the station, and they were crawling down the slippery incline to the wharf, menaced by swaying coal-carts, bewildered horses, dishevelled express-wagons, and an empty hearse—ah, that hearse!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But being shy and retiring persons, with no natural inclination for their part, they lived as much as possible in the sylvan solitude of Skuytercliff, and when they came to town, declined all invitations on the plea of Mrs. van der Luyden's health.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Dr. Carver inclined his leonine head, and the Marchioness continued: "Ah, New York—New York—how little the life of the spirit has reached it!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mrs. van der Luyden's attitude said neither yes nor no, but always appeared to incline to clemency till her thin lips, wavering into the shadow of a smile, made the almost invariable reply: "I shall first have to talk this over with my husband.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: I`m inclined to
as in: on an incline or incline his head
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

Go to Book Vocabulary Learn more easily.   Think more clearly.   Express more effectively.