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The Age of Innocence
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concede -- as in: concede the point
Used In
The Age of Innocence
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  • "Nice" women, however wronged, would never claim the kind of freedom he meant, and generous-minded men like himself were therefore—in the heat of argument—the more chivalrously ready to concede it to them.
  • Of course," Mr. Jackson reluctantly conceded, "it’s to be hoped they can tide him over—this time anyhow.
  • "But you must have three weeks to do India properly," her husband conceded, anxious to have it understood that he was no frivolous globe-trotter.
  • "Ah, well, Boston is more conservative than New York; but I always think it’s a safe rule for a lady to lay aside her French dresses for one season," Mrs. Archer conceded.
  • It was thought "very English" to have a country-house lent to one, and the fact gave a last touch of distinction to what was generally conceded to be the most brilliant wedding of the year; but where the house was no one was permitted to know, except the parents of bride and groom, who, when taxed with the knowledge, pursed their lips and said mysteriously: "Ah, they didn’t tell us—" which was manifestly true, since there was no need to.

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  • The candidate conceded after enough votes had come in to show that he would lose
  • There are also many modifications of language, which we concede to the poets.
    Aristotle  --  The Poetics of Aristotle

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