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The Age of Innocence
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The Age of Innocence
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  • it was against all the rules of their code that the mother and son should ever allude to what was uppermost in their thoughts
  • Mrs. Archer ignored the allusion to the ancestral cuisine and Mr. Jackson continued with deliberation: "No, she was NOT at the ball."
  • Besides, it struck him as a little absurd to allude to the matter.
  • He had not heard her divorce spoken of since Janey’s first random allusion to it, and had dismissed the tale as unfounded gossip.
  • She had never before made any allusion to the flowers, and he supposed she had never thought of him as the sender.
  • She ended with a conventional "Yours sincerely," and without any allusion to the date of her return.
  • Archer rose to go, and as his hand met Madame Olenska’s he felt that she was waiting for him to make some allusion to her unanswered letter.
  • The allusion brought the colour to her cheek, and it reflected itself in Archer’s vivid blush.
  • The background lent itself to allusions to European scenes; and May, who was looking her loveliest under a wide-brimmed hat that cast a shadow of mystery over her too-clear eyes, kindled into eagerness as he spoke of Granada and the Alhambra.
  • In his brief letter to her he had made no allusion to M. Riviere’s visit, and his intention had been to bury the incident in his bosom.
  • It was at this point that Mr. Jackson seized the chance to place his favourite allusion.
  • The subject which had called forth Mr. Sillerton Jackson’s favourite allusion had been brought up (Archer fancied not without intention) by their hostess.
  • To come to the Opera in a Brown coupe was almost as honourable a way of arriving as in one’s own carriage; and departure by the same means had the immense advantage of enabling one (with a playful allusion to democratic principles) to scramble into the first Brown conveyance in the line, instead of waiting till the cold-and-gin congested nose of one’s own coachman gleamed under the portico of the Academy.
  • During dinner their talk moved in its usual limited circle; but Archer noticed that his wife made no allusion to Madame Olenska, nor to old Catherine’s reception of her.
  • She was persuaded that irrepressible passion was the cause of his impatience; and being an ardent admirer of impulsiveness (when it did not lead to the spending of money) she always received him with a genial twinkle of complicity and a play of allusion to which May seemed fortunately impervious.
  • This struck from all three allusions to Edgar Poe and Jules Verne, and such platitudes as naturally rise to the lips of the most intelligent when they are talking against time, and dealing with a new invention in which it would seem ingenuous to believe too soon; and the question of the telephone carried them safely back to the big house.
  • Her careless allusion had no doubt been the straw held up to see which way the wind blew; the result had been reported to the family, and thereafter Archer had been tacitly omitted from their counsels.
  • …of form, he had formed a wife so completely to his own convenience that, in the most conspicuous moments of his frequent love-affairs with other men’s wives, she went about in smiling unconsciousness, saying that "Lawrence was so frightfully strict"; and had been known to blush indignantly, and avert her gaze, when some one alluded in her presence to the fact that Julius Beaufort (as became a "foreigner" of doubtful origin) had what was known in New York as "another establishment."
  • ("Especially after that silly business with Mrs. Rushworth," as she had remarked to Janey, alluding to what had once seemed to Newland a tragedy of which his soul would always bear the scar.
  • No one alluded to Ellen Olenska; but Archer knew that Mrs. Welland was thinking: "It’s a mistake for Ellen to be seen, the very day after her arrival, parading up Fifth Avenue at the crowded hour with Julius Beaufort—" and the young man himself mentally added: "And she ought to know that a man who’s just engaged doesn’t spend his time calling on married women.

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  • He alluded to Susan without mentioning her name.
  • She didn’t mention any names, but everyone knew she was alluding to the President.

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