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irony
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irony
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Washington Square
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as in: verbal irony Define
saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else -- usually as humor or sarcasm
  • ...he almost never addressed his daughter save in the ironical form.

  • There are no more uses of "irony" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She was being ironic when she said she couldn’t wait to see you again.
  • Her voice was dripping with irony as she said, "You look beautiful."

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unspecified meaning
  • And, with all his irony, her father believed her.
  • The world, which, as I have said, appreciated him, pitied him too much to be ironical; his misfortune made him more interesting, and even helped him to be the fashion.

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  • This was very interesting; but in the midst of it Marian Almond came pushing through the crowd, with a little ironical cry, when she found these young people still together, which made every one turn round, and cost Catherine a conscious blush.
  • There were portions left over, light remnants and snippets of irony, which she never knew what to do with, which seemed too delicate for her own use; and yet Catherine, lamenting the limitations of her understanding, felt that they were too valuable to waste and had a belief that if they passed over her head they yet contributed to the general sum of human wisdom.
  • And I had a sort of foolish hope that you would come home without that odious ironical tone with which you treat the most sacred subjects.
  • "Don’t undervalue irony, it is often of great use.
  • "My dear Lavinia," exclaimed the Doctor, "do you call that irony?

  • There are no more uses of "irony" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: situational irony Define
when what happens is very different than what might be expected; or when things seem incongruous together -- especially when amusing or an entertaining coincidence
as in: verbal irony Define
saying or writing one thing, while meaning the opposite or something else -- usually as humor or sarcasm
as in: dramatic irony Define
when the meaning of a situation is understood by the reader or audience but not by the characters in the story (such as in the play, Romeo and Juliet)
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