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cease
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The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde - (13 chapter version)
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cease
Used In
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde - (13 chapter version)
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  • Who could say where the fleshly impulse ceased, or the psychical impulse began?
  • There is always something ridiculous about the passions of people whom one has ceased to love.
  • For a moment he thought of praying that the horrible sympathy that existed between him and the picture might cease.
  • The people who have adored me—there have not been very many, but there have been some— have always insisted on living on, long after I had ceased to care for them, or they to care for me.
  • When she leaned over the balcony and came to those wonderful lines,— Although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract to-night: It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden; Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be Ere one can say, "It lightens."
  • But a chance tone of color in a room or a morning sky, a particular perfume that you had once loved and that brings strange memories with it, a line from a forgotten poem that you had come across again, a cadence from a piece of music that you had ceased to play,—I tell you, Dorian, that it is on things like these that our lives depend.

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