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consequence
in
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde - (13 chapter version)
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consequence
Used In
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde - (13 chapter version)
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  • A bishop keeps on saying at the age of eighty what he was told to say when he was a boy of eighteen, and consequently he always looks absolutely delightful.
  • They are all men of some intellectual power, and consequently they all appreciate me.
  • The consequence is that he has nothing left for life but his prejudices, his principles, and his common sense.
  • Good artists give everything to their art, and consequently are perfectly uninteresting in themselves.
  • I have promised to dine at White’s, but it is only with an old friend, so I can send him a wire and say that I am ill, or that I am prevented from coming in consequence of a subsequent engagement.
  • And, yet, who, that knew anything about Life, would surrender the chance of remaining always young, however fantastic that chance might be, or with what fateful consequences it might be fraught?

  • There are no more uses of "consequence" in the book.


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