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The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde - (13 chapter version)
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The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde - (13 chapter version)
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  • They were as grotesque as the scenery, and that looked as if it had come out of a pantomime of fifty years ago.
  • He had seen grotesque children huddled upon door-steps, and had heard shrieks and oaths from gloomy courts.
  • The outstretched arms shot up convulsively three times, waving grotesque stiff-fingered hands in the air.
  • He never knew—never, indeed, had any cause to know—that somewhat grotesque dread of mirrors, and polished metal surfaces, and still water, which came upon the young Parisian so early in his life, and was occasioned by the sudden decay of a beauty that had once, apparently, been so remarkable.
  • —more horrible, it seemed to him for the moment, than the silent thing that he knew was stretched across the table, the thing whose grotesque misshapen shadow on the spotted carpet showed him that it had not stirred, but was still there, as he had left it.
  • …sometimes wakened before dawn, either after one of those dreamless nights that make one almost enamoured of death, or one of those nights of horror and misshapen joy, when through the chambers of the brain sweep phantoms more terrible than reality itself, and instinct with that vivid life that lurks in all grotesques, and that lends to Gothic art its enduring vitality, this art being, one might fancy, especially the art of those whose minds have been troubled with the malady of revery.

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