To better see all uses of the word
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde - (13 chapter version)
please enable javascript.

Go to New Version of This Page
This old version has not been updated since 2016,
but we're leaving it in case you prefer it.
Show What's New
Please update your links from the new version.
Used In
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde - (13 chapter version)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • From a moral point of view I really don’t think much of your great renunciation.
  • Don’t spoil it by renunciations.
  • Had there been nothing more in his renunciation than that?
  • …being, indeed, simply a psychological study of a certain young Parisian, who spent his life trying to realize in the nineteenth century all the passions and modes of thought that belonged to every century except his own, and to sum up, as it were, in himself the various moods through which the world-spirit had ever passed, loving for their mere artificiality those renunciations that men have unwisely called virtue, as much as those natural rebellions that wise men still call sin.

  • There are no more uses of "renounce" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading