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The Picture of Dorian Gray
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The Picture of Dorian Gray
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  • "I am afraid that your nephew is prejudiced against that great country," he said to Lady Agatha.
  • His principles were out of date, but there was a good deal to be said for his prejudices.
  • The consequence is that he has nothing left for life but his prejudices, his principles, and his common-sense.
  • We are not sent into the world to air our moral prejudices.
  • Indeed, the probabilities are that the more insincere the man is, the more purely intellectual will the idea be, as in that case it will not be coloured by either his wants, his desires, or his prejudices.
  • But in London people are so prejudiced.
  • The middle classes air their moral prejudices over their gross dinner-tables, and whisper about what they call the profligacies of their betters in order to try and pretend that they are in smart society, and on intimate terms with the people they slander.

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  • The group works to eliminate racial prejudice.
  • If you don’t overcome your prejudice, you will harm yourself and others.

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