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The Picture of Dorian Gray
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The Picture of Dorian Gray
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  • It was a tawdry affair, all Cupids and cornucopias, like a third-rate wedding cake.
  • "My son, don’t say such dreadful things," murmured Mrs. Vane, taking up a tawdry theatrical dress, with a sigh, and beginning to patch it.
  • They talked to each other across the theatre, and shared their oranges with the tawdry girls who sat beside them.
  • But you must think of that lonely death in the tawdry dressing-room simply as a strange lurid fragment from some Jacobean tragedy, as a wonderful scene from Webster, or Ford, or Cyril Tourneur.
  • In one corner, with his head buried in his arms, a sailor sprawled over a table, and by the tawdrily-painted bar that ran across one complete side stood two haggard women mocking an old man who was brushing the sleeves of his coat with an expression of disgust.

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  • These women wore stoles of fur or feathers; their dresses were tawdry colors—reds and oranges and yellows.
    Margaret Peterson Haddix  --  Uprising
  • In his last breaths, was he trying to tell me about the death of his adopted family—or admit to some tawdry, decades-long affair?
    Ransom Riggs  --  Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

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