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loathe
in
The Picture of Dorian Gray
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loathe
Used In
The Picture of Dorian Gray
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  • Would it teach him to loathe his own soul?
  • All that it really demonstrated was that our future would be the same as our past, and that the sin we had done once, and with loathing, we would do many times, and with joy.
  • Dorian Gray loathed him more than ever.
  • It seemed to him that it was unchanged; and yet his loathing of it was intensified.
  • Was it to become a monstrous and loathsome thing, to be hidden away in a locked room, to be shut out from the sunlight that had so often touched to brighter gold the waving wonder of its hair?
  • What was that loathsome red dew that gleamed, wet and glistening, on one of the hands, as though the canvas had sweated blood?
  • The mad passions of a hunted animal stirred within him, and he loathed the man who was seated at the table, more than in his whole life he had ever loathed anything.
  • There was something in its expression that filled him with disgust and loathing.
  • He watched it as though it were a thing that could fascinate and make afraid, as though it held something that he longed for and yet almost loathed.
  • The mad passions of a hunted animal stirred within him, and he loathed the man who was seated at the table, more than in his whole life he had ever loathed anything.
  • He was withered, wrinkled, and loathsome of visage.
  • Then he loathed his own beauty, and, flinging the mirror on the floor, crushed it into silver splinters beneath his heel.
  • The thing was still loathsome—more loathsome, if possible, than before—and the scarlet dew that spotted the hand seemed brighter, and more like blood newly spilt.
  • The thing was still loathsome—more loathsome, if possible, than before—and the scarlet dew that spotted the hand seemed brighter, and more like blood newly spilt.
  • On his return he would sit in front of the picture, sometimes loathing it and himself, but filled, at other times, with that pride of individualism that is half the fascination of sin, and smiling with secret pleasure, at the misshapen shadow that had to bear the burden that should have been his own.
  • The coarse brawl, the loathsome den, the crude violence of disordered life, the very vileness of thief and outcast, were more vivid, in their intense actuality of impression, than all the gracious shapes of Art, the dreamy shadows of Song.
  • He winced at the memory of all that he had suffered, and for a moment the same curious feeling of loathing for Basil Hallward that had made him kill him as he sat in the chair, came back to him, and he grew cold with passion.

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  • I make New Year’s resolutions every year and then loathe myself for breaking them.
  • I loathe that man. He ruined my life.

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