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utter
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The Mill on the Floss
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utter
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
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as in: utter stupidity Define
complete or total (used as an intensifier--typically when stressing how bad something is)
  • That fine moral aroma would not have been thought much of by the public opinion of Kennel Yard, which was the very focus or heart of Bob’s world, even if it could have made itself perceptible there; yet, for all that, he was not utterly a sneak and a thief as our friend Tom had hastily decided.
  • He thought he had the demonstration of facts observed through years by his own eyes, which gave no warning of their imperfection, that Maggie’s nature was utterly untrustworthy, and too strongly marked with evil tendencies to be safely treated with leniency.

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  • …country could never again be what it used to be; but Mr. Deane, attached to a firm of which the returns were on the increase, naturally took a more lively view of the present, and had some details to give concerning the state of the imports, especially in hides and spelter, which soothed Mr. Tulliver’s imagination by throwing into more distant perspective the period when the country would become utterly the prey of Papists and Radicals, and there would be no more chance for honest men.

  • There are no more uses of "utter" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She suffered utter devastation when her child died in the accident.
  • The company is in danger of utter collapse.

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unspecified meaning
  • You make it your own in uttering it, and naturally get fond of it.
  • As Mrs. Tulliver uttered the last sentence, she drew a bright bunch of keys from her pocket, and singled out one, rubbing her thumb and finger up and down it with a placid smile while she looked at the clear fire.

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  • Maggie could not utter it.
  • The Dodsons were a very proud race, and their pride lay in the utter frustration of all desire to tax them with a breach of traditional duty or propriety.
  • Maggie’s sense of loneliness, and utter privation of joy, had deepened with the brightness of advancing spring.
  • Her voice was rather agitated as she uttered the last words, but the sound of wheels diverted her thoughts.
  • When one of the family was in trouble or sickness, all the rest went to visit the unfortunate member, usually at the same time, and did not shrink from uttering the most disagreeable truths that correct family feeling dictated; if the illness or trouble was the sufferer’s own fault, it was not in the practice of the Dodson family to shrink from saying so.
  • She did not read the letter: she heard him uttering it, and the voice shook her with its old strange power.
  • She could not trust herself to utter the full forgiveness that rose in answer to that confession.
  • But her lips would not utter that, and she was silent.

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  • He dreaded to utter another word, he dreaded to make another movement, that might provoke another reproach or denial from her.
  • But at last a mist gathered over the blue-gray eyes, and the lips found a word they could utter,—the old childish "Magsie!"
  • Lucy had looked up from her work as she uttered the last sentence, and saw that there was a change in Maggie’s face.
  • She had uttered words long ago in her young ignorance; it was enough to make her hate him that these should be continually present with her as a bond.
  • Maggie’s voice was getting choked as she uttered these last words.
  • There was a moment of utter bewilderment before her mind could get disentangled from the confused web of dreams; but soon the whole terrible truth urged itself upon her.
  • Mr. Tulliver walked abruptly out of the arbor as he uttered the last sentence, and, without looking round at Mr. Moss, went on to the kitchen door, where the eldest boy was holding his horse, and his sister was waiting in a state of wondering alarm, which was not without its alleviations, for baby was making pleasant gurgling sounds, and performing a great deal of finger practice on the faded face.
  • Stephen’s voice, pouring in again, jarred upon his nervous susceptibility as if it had been the clang of sheet-iron, and he felt inclined to make the piano shriek in utter discord.
  • His mother’s arms were round his neck as soon as the last words were uttered, and she said, half crying: "Oh, my boy, I knew you’d make iverything right again, when you got a man."
  • But at last she heard the word "dearest" uttered in the softest tone of pained entreaty, like that of a patient who asks for something that ought to have been given without asking.
  • Such things, uttered in low, broken tones by the one voice that has first stirred the fibre of young passion, have only a feeble effect—on experienced minds at a distance from them.
  • He shouldn’t like his father to be under Wakem; he thought it would look mean-spirited; but his mother’s main distress was the utter impossibility of ever "turning Mr. Tulliver round about Wakem," or getting him to hear reason; no, they would all have to go and live in a pigsty on purpose to spite Wakem, who spoke "so as nobody could be fairer."
  • There was a little tremor in Tom’s voice as he uttered the last words, and Maggie’s ready affection came back with as sudden a glow as when they were children, and bit their cake together as a sacrament of conciliation.
  • Maggie had no sooner uttered this entreaty than she was wretched at the admission it implied; but Stephen turned away at once, and following her upward glance, he saw Philip Wakem sealed in the half-hidden corner, so that he could command little more than that angle of the hall in which Maggie sat.
  • Maggie had frequent tidings through her mother, or aunt Glegg, or Dr. Kenn, of Lucy’s gradual progress toward recovery, and her thoughts tended continually toward her uncle Deane’s house; she hungered for an interview with Lucy, if it were only for five minutes, to utter a word of penitence, to be assured by Lucy’s own eyes and lips that she did not believe in the willing treachery of those whom she had loved and trusted.
  • (These last words were uttered in a tone of sorrowful agitation.
  • To have taken Maggie by the hand and said, "I will not believe unproved evil of you; my lips shall not utter it; my ears shall be closed against it; I, too, am an erring mortal, liable to stumble, apt to come short of my most earnest efforts; your lot has been harder than mine, your temptation greater; let us help each other to stand and walk without more falling,"—to have done this would have demanded courage, deep pity, self-knowledge, generous trust; would have demanded a mind that…
  • The tiny woman curtsied and looked up at Maggie with some awe as soon as she had opened the door; but the words, "Is my brother at home?" which Maggie uttered smilingly, made her turn round with sudden excitement, and say,— "Eh, mother, mother—tell Bob!

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: utter stupidity Define
complete or total (used as an intensifier--typically when stressing how bad something is)
as in: utter a complaint Define
say something aloud
as in: utter a sound Define
make a sound with the voice
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
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