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wretched
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The Mill on the Floss
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wretched
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
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  • Maggie sobbed aloud, finding a wretched pleasure in the hollow resonance that came through the long empty space of the attic.
  • Mrs. Tulliver was mute, feeling herself a truly wretched mother.
  • It makes me wretched to see you benumbing and cramping your nature in this way.
  • Then her brain would be busy with wild romances of a flight from home in search of something less sordid and dreary; she would go to some great man—Walter Scott, perhaps—and tell him how wretched and how clever she was, and he would surely do something for her.
  • Philip went home soon after in a state of hideous doubt mingled with wretched certainty.
  • It is the only right thing, dearest; it is the only way of escaping from this wretched entanglement.
  • You are fatigued, and it may soon rain; it may be a wretched business, getting to Torby in this boat.
  • The unusual tone, the startling words, arrested Maggie’s sob, and she sat quite still, wondering; as if Stephen might have seen some possibilities that would alter everything, and annul the wretched facts.
  • Maggie had no sooner uttered this entreaty than she was wretched at the admission it implied; but Stephen turned away at once, and following her upward glance, he saw Philip Wakem sealed in the half-hidden corner, so that he could command little more than that angle of the hall in which Maggie sat.
  • Tom was dejected by the thought that his exemplary effort must always be baffled by the wrong-doing of others; Maggie was living through, over and over again, the agony of the moment in which she had rushed to throw herself on her father’s arm, with a vague, shuddering foreboding of wretched scenes to come.
  • It was impossible for him now to resist the conviction that there was some mutual consciousness between Stephen and Maggie; and for half the night his irritable, susceptible nerves were pressed upon almost to frenzy by that one wretched fact; he could attempt no explanation that would reconcile it with her words and actions.
  • "Oh, aunt Gritty, I’m very wretched!
  • "It always made me wretched that I felt what I didn’t like you to know.

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  • The children were taken into protective custody due to their wretched living conditions.
  • The photograph showed poor people in a wretched village in East Africa.

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