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resolution
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The Mill on the Floss
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resolution
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
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as in: a New Year's resolution Define
a firm decision to do something
  • We have failed to keep our resolutions;

  • There are no more uses of "resolution" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • Her New Year’s resolution is to read deeply at least one hour a day.
  • Are you making any New Year’s resolutions this year?

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as in: Her resolution weakened. Define
determination
  • At one time you take pleasure in a sort of perverse self-denial, and at another you have not resolution to resist a thing that you know to be wrong.

  • There are no more uses of "resolution" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She ran each mile of the marathon with increasing resolution.
  • Through many years and hardships, her resolution to serve the poor never wavered.

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unspecified meaning
  • The resolution that gathered in her mind, after Tom and Lucy had walked away, was not so simple as that of going home.
  • This resolution lasted in great intensity for five dark minutes behind the tub; but then the need of being loved—the strongest need in poor Maggie’s nature—began to wrestle with her pride, and soon threw it.

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  • But Mr. Tulliver was determined not to encourage such shuffling people any longer; and a ride along the Basset lanes was not likely to enervate a man’s resolution by softening his temper.
  • This resolution to come downstairs was heard with trembling by the wife and children.
  • Philip seriously believed what he said, but he said it with vehemence because it made an argument against the resolution that opposed his wishes.
  • It is the moment when our resolution seems about to become irrevocable—when the fatal iron gates are about to close upon us—that tests our strength.
  • Some reason or other there was why Mr. Stelling deferred the execution of many spirited projects,—why he did not begin the editing of his Greek play, or any other work of scholarship, in his leisure hours, but, after turning the key of his private study with much resolution, sat down to one of Theodore Hook’s novels.
  • Maggie and Tom were still very much like young animals, and so she could rub her cheek against his, and kiss his ear in a random sobbing way; and there were tender fibres in the lad that had been used to answer to Maggie’s fondling, so that he behaved with a weakness quite inconsistent with his resolution to punish her as much as she deserved.
  • You may think that I am unable to keep my resolutions; but at least you ought not to treat me with hard contempt on the ground of faults that I have not committed yet.
  • We have proved that it was impossible to keep our resolutions.

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  • His tone implied something more than mere hopefulness or resolution.
  • She rose from her chair with a sudden resolution, and laying Minny on his cushion, went to reach Lucy’s large work-basket from its corner.
  • At first he began his mornings with a resolution that he would not dine there, not even go in the evening, till Maggie was away.
  • "But there are ties that can’t be kept by mere resolution," said Stephen, starting up and walking about again.
  • "No, not with my whole heart and soul, Stephen," she said with timid resolution.
  • She must rely on a slower appeal to Stephen’s better self; she must be prepared for a harder task than that of rushing away while resolution was fresh.
  • Mrs. Tulliver, seeing that everything had gone wrong, had begun to think she had been too passive in life; and that, if she had applied her mind to business, and taken a strong resolution now and then, it would have been all the better for her and her family.
  • With new resolution, Maggie seized her oar, and stood up again to paddle; but the now ebbing tide added to the swiftness of the river, and she was carried along beyond the bridge.
  • They had begun the morning with an indifferent salutation, and both had rejoiced in being aloof from each other, like a patient who has actually done without his opium, in spite of former failures in resolution.
  • She stopped to pant a little, reflecting that running away was not a pleasant thing until one had got quite to the common where the gypsies were, but her resolution had not abated; she presently passed through the gate into the lane, not knowing where it would lead her, for it was not this way that they came from Dorlcote Mill to Garum Firs, and she felt all the safer for that, because there was no chance of her being overtaken.
  • But to pace up and down the deck leaning on Stephen—being upheld by his strength—was the first change that she needed; then came food, and then quiet reclining on the cushions, with the sense that no new resolution could be taken that day.
  • But the journey was not taken, and by the fourth morning no distinct resolution was formed about the evenings; they were only foreseen as times when Maggie would still be present for a little while,—when one more touch, one more glance, might be snatched.
  • In the severity of her early resolution, she would take Aldrich out into the fields, and then look off her book toward the sky, where the lark was twinkling, or to the reeds and bushes by the river, from which the waterfowl rustled forth on its anxious, awkward flight,—with a startled sense that the relation between Aldrich and this living world was extremely remote for her.
  • He himself wanted a daily governess for his younger children; and though he had hesitated in the first instance to offer this position to Maggie, the resolution to protest with the utmost force of his personal and priestly character against her being crushed and driven away by slander, was now decisive.
  • It required nearly a fortnight for fine instinct to assure itself of these inspirations; indeed, it was a whole week before Stephen’s letter came, telling his father the facts, and adding that he was gone across to Holland,—had drawn upon the agent at Mudport for money,—was incapable of any resolution at present.
  • Mr. Glegg, who had contracted a cautious liking for Tom ever since his spirited and sensible behavior when the execution was in the house, was now warming into a resolution to further his prospects actively,—some time, when an opportunity offered of doing so in a prudent manner, without ultimate loss; but Mrs. Glegg observed that she was not given to speak without book, as some people were; that those who said least were most likely to find their words made good; and that when the…
  • But I’ll Pivart him!" added Mr. Tulliver, lifting his glass with a sense that he had defined his resolution in an unmistakable manner.
  • Chapter II Mr. Tulliver, of Dorlcote Mill, Declares His Resolution about Tom "What I want, you know," said Mr. Tulliver,—"what I want is to give Tom a good eddication; an eddication as’ll be a bread to him.
  • …for four hours, and had brought some weariness and exhaustion; the recoil of her fatigued sensations from the impracticable difficulty of getting out of the boat at this unknown distance from home, and walking for long miles,—all helped to bring her into more complete subjection to that strong, mysterious charm which made a last parting from Stephen seem the death of all joy, and made the thought of wounding him like the first touch of the torturing iron before which resolution shrank.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a New Year's resolution Define
a firm decision to do something
as in: a United Nations resolution Define
a formal expression of opinion arrived at by a group vote
as in: Her resolution weakened. Define
determination
as in: a dispute resolution fund Define
a solution or outcome
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