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premises
used in
The Mill on the Floss
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premises
Used in
The Mill on the Floss
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  • you may leave my premises to-morrow, then; hold your insolent tongue and let me pass.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But the strongest influence of all was the love of the old premises where he had run about when he was a boy, just as Tom had done after him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • To think that the very day—the very day_—after Tom had come back from Newcastle, that unfortunate young Jetsome, whom Mr. Wakem had placed at the Mill, had been pitched off his horse in a drunken fit, and was lying at St. Ogg's in a dangerous state, so that Wakem had signified his wish that the new purchasers should enter on the premises at once!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Aunt Pullet was quite willing to take the shortest means of restoring her premises to order and quiet, and it was not long before Mrs. Tulliver was in the chaise, looking anxiously at the most distant point before her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • As usual, the thought pressed upon her that people would think she had done something wicked to deserve her maternal troubles, while Mrs. Pullet began to give elaborate directions to Sally how to guard the premises from serious injury in the course of removing the dirt.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • had not bought the mill; both mill and land had been knocked down to Wakem, who had been over the premises, and had laid before Mr. Deane and Mr. Glegg, in Mrs. Tulliver's presence, his willingness to employ Mr. Tulliver, in case of his recovery, as a manager of the business.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Tom had been too much interested in his talk with Luke, in going the round of the premises, walking in and out where he pleased, and whittling sticks without any particular reason,—except that he didn't whittle sticks at school,—to think of Maggie and the effect his anger had produced on her.  (not reviewed by editor)

Samples from Other Sources
  • She was injured on the premises of the defendant.

  • "Then," I said, "you have been making a miscalculation, and the letter is not upon the premises, as you suppose."
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Purloined Letter

  • He refuses to do any copying; he refuses to do any thing; he says he prefers not to; and he refuses to quit the premises.
    Herman Melville  --  Bartleby, the Scrivener: a Story of Wall Street

  • They would like permission to search the premises, which means we have to vote.
    Veronica Roth  --  Insurgent
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