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tête-à-tête
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The Mill on the Floss
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tête-à-tête -- (French)
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
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  • But their tete-a-tete was curtailed by the appearance of Mrs. Deane with little Lucy; and Mrs. Tulliver had to look on with a silent pang while Lucy’s blond curls were adjusted.
  • It was altogether so embarrassing to be seated tete-a-tete with uncle Pullet, that Tom could not even look at the prints on the walls, or the flycages, or the wonderful flower-pots; he saw nothing but his uncle’s gaiters.
  • The only alleviating circumstance in a tete-a-tete with uncle Pullet was that he kept a variety of lozenges and peppermint-drops about his person, and when at a loss for conversation, he filled up the void by proposing a mutual solace of this kind.
  • There will be no possibility of a tete-a-tete with you any more, unless you can find an admirer for her, who will pair off with her occasionally.

  • There are no more uses of "tête-à-tête" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • Our last tete-a-tete?
    Henrik Ibsen  --  Hedda Gabler
  • The countess wished to have a tete-a-tete talk with the friend of her childhood, Princess Anna Mikhaylovna, whom she had not seen properly since she returned from Petersburg.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace

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Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
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