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The Mill on the Floss
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The Mill on the Floss
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  • Maggie started a little on being roused from her reverie, and said, "What?"
  • Clearly, she had not time to indulge in long reveries about her own happy love-affairs.
  • Walking along the street with a firm, rapid step, at this point in his reverie he was startled by some one who had crossed without his notice, and who said to him in a rough, familiar voice: "Why, Master Tom, how’s your father this morning?"
  • This roused her from her reverie, and she asked if she might take an oar.
  • At last Maggie’s eyes glanced down on the books that lay on the window-shelf, and she half forsook her reverie to turn over listlessly the leaves of the "Portrait Gallery," but she soon pushed this aside to examine the little row of books tied together with string.
  • It was not that she thought distinctly of Mr. Stephen Guest, or dwelt on the indications that he looked at her with admiration; it was rather that she felt the half-remote presence of a world of love and beauty and delight, made up of vague, mingled images from all the poetry and romance she had ever read, or had ever woven in her dreamy reveries.

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  • I was lost in reverie and missed her third point.
  • At this memory, I smile, but Ruth’s voice cuts through my reverie, her disappointment evident.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Longest Ride

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