To see all instances of the word
reconcile
used in
The Mill on the Floss
please enable javascript.

reconcile
Used in
The Mill on the Floss
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • He could not be reconciled with his lot.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In her childish days Maggie held this place, called the Red Deeps, in very great awe, and needed all her confidence in Tom's bravery to reconcile her to an excursion thither,—visions of robbers and fierce animals haunting every hollow.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And she would still brush and carefully tend Maggie's hair, which she had become reconciled to, in spite of its refusal to curl, now it was so long and massy.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The tears flowed so plentifully that Maggie saw nothing around her for the next ten minutes; but by that time resentment began to give way to the desire of reconciliation, and she jumped from her bough to look for Tom.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mrs. Tulliver had suggested to him several determining motives, and his mental glance was very rapid; he was one of those men who can be prompt without being rash, because their motives run in fixed tracks, and they have no need to reconcile conflicting aims.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I was nurtured in the sense of privation; I never expected happiness; and in knowing you, in loving you, I have had, and still have, what reconciles me to life.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It was impossible for him now to resist the conviction that there was some mutual consciousness between Stephen and Maggie; and for half the night his irritable, susceptible nerves were pressed upon almost to frenzy by that one wretched fact; he could attempt no explanation that would reconcile it with her words and actions.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She thought of her father as she ran along, but she reconciled herself to the idea of parting with him, by determining that she would secretly send him a letter by a small gypsy, who would run away without telling where she was, and just let him know that she was well and happy, and always loved him very much.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It had been very difficult for him to reconcile himself to the idea that his school-time was to be prolonged and that he was not to be brought up to his father's business, which he had always thought extremely pleasant; for it was nothing but riding about, giving orders, and going to market; and he thought that a clergyman would give him a great many Scripture lessons, and probably make him learn the Gospel and Epistle on a Sunday, as well as the Collect.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: reconciled their differences
as in: reconciled herself to
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

Go to Book Vocabulary
VerbalWorkout.com Learn more easily.   Think more clearly.   Express more effectively.